WSSF

World Social Science Forum 2018

Sep, 25-28, 2018 FUKUOKA, JAPAN

Security and Equality for Sustainable Futures

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  Program  

25-SEP / DAY 1 / PROGRAM

DAY 1

Tuesday / 25-Sept
12:30-14:00

Plenary DAY1

Existential Risks

ISC

Abstract:

The last four decades have seen the development of new forms of war and conflict, environmental change, emerging risks from new technology and growing tensions due to increasing numbers of refugees and displaced people. The future of humanity, may well be determined by how we deal with these issues.

One of the world’s most famous social scientists, Craig Calhoun, President of the Berggruen Institute, will moderate a forward-looking discussion of existential risks, hearing from a unique group of leading experts such as the ‘renegade economist’ Kate Raworth, author of the best-selling book Doughnut Economics – Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist; the peace and conflict resolution expert and former Minister of Environmental Development (Morelos, Mexico) Ursula Oswald Spring; as well as Emiko Okuyama who, as Mayor of Sendai, played a critical role in the reconstruction of the city after the 2011 tsunami.

Speakers:

  • Kate Raworth, Senior Visiting Research Associate, Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, Researcher, the National University of Mexico-Regional Multidisciplinary Research Center (CRIM-UNAMU)
  • Emiko Okuyama, Former Mayor of the City of Sendai 2009-2017

Moderator: Craig Calhoun, President of Berggruen Institute and Former Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science

Parallel DAY 1: CS1-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS1-02 ‘Materially-mediated’responses to environmentally-induced crises

Chair:

  • Koji Mizoguchi, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Graeme Barker, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Past human responses to climate change: separating science from story-telling
  • Enrico Crema, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Archaeological Approaches to Demography: old problems and new challenges
  • Junko Uchida, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    - The decline of the late Shang authority: causes and reactions
  • Mitsuhiro Kuwahata, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The resettlement process in the severely affected areas after the Kikai-Akahoya eruption
  • Koji Mizoguchi, Kyushu University, Japan
    -‘Materially-mediated’ responses to environmentally-induced crises

coming soon

Parallel DAY 1: CS3-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS3-02 The wild food basket: recreating urban and rural ecosystems as food sources

Chair:

  • Norie Tamura, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Mai Kobayashi, RIHN, Japan
    - A look in to Bhutan’s transitions in wild food security
  • Norie Tamura , RIHN, Japan
    - Wild food basket and rural revitalization
  • Max Spiegelberg, RIHN, Japan
    - Honey bees in urban Kyoto—a revival story? Bee super-highways and potential impact on urban agriculture
  • Akito Yasuda, Kyusyu University, Japan
    Hunting and wild meat eating in Japan
  • Hiromune Mitsuhashi, The Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Japan
    Rewilding the river ecosystem and freshwater fish eating in Japan

Parallel DAY 1: CS3-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS3-03 Material deprivation and social security of children in developed countries in Asia

Chair:

  • Aya K. ABE, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Yuvisthi NAIDOO, University of new South Wales, Australia
    - Child Poverty in Australia: Examining the Impact of Different Approaches and Measures
  • Aya K. ABE, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
    - Consistency of Parent-reported and child-reported material deprivation and their relationship to psychological well-being of children in Tokyo
  • Maggie K.W. LAU, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
    - Material well-being, quality of relationships and problem behaviours of Hong Kong children
  • Kunio URAKAWA, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Analysis of poverty of income and living time in Japan: An approach from estimation of CES well-being function

Parallel DAY 1: CS1-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS1-02 ‘Materially-mediated’ responses to environmentally-induced crises

Chair:

  • Koji Mizoguchi, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Graeme Barker, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Past human responses to climate change: separating science from story-telling
  • Enrico Crema, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Archaeological Approaches to Demography: old problems and new challenges
  • Junko Uchida, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    - The decline of the late Shang authority: causes and reactions
  • Mitsuhiro Kuwahata, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The resettlement process in the severely affected areas after the Kikai-Akahoya eruption
  • Koji Mizoguchi, Kyushu University, Japan
    -‘Materially-mediated’ responses to environmentally-induced crises

coming soon

Parallel DAY 1: CS3-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS3-02 The wild food basket: recreating urban and rural ecosystems as food sources

Chair:

  • Norie Tamura, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Mai Kobayashi, RIHN, Japan
    - A look in to Bhutan’s transitions in wild food security
  • Norie Tamura , RIHN, Japan
    - Wild food basket and rural revitalization
  • Max Spiegelberg, RIHN, Japan
    - Honey bees in urban Kyoto—a revival story? Bee super-highways and potential impact on urban agriculture
  • Akito Yasuda, Kyusyu University, Japan
    Hunting and wild meat eating in Japan
  • Hiromune Mitsuhashi, The Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Japan
    Rewilding the river ecosystem and freshwater fish eating in Japan

Parallel DAY 1: CS3-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS3-03 Material deprivation and social security of children in developed countries in Asia

Chair:

  • Aya K. ABE, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Yuvisthi NAIDOO, University of new South Wales, Australia
    - Child Poverty in Australia: Examining the Impact of Different Approaches and Measures
  • Aya K. ABE, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
    - Consistency of Parent-reported and child-reported material deprivation and their relationship to psychological well-being of children in Tokyo
  • Maggie K.W. LAU, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
    - Material well-being, quality of relationships and problem behaviours of Hong Kong children
  • Kunio URAKAWA, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Analysis of poverty of income and living time in Japan: An approach from estimation of CES well-being function

coming soon

Parallel DAY 1: CS4-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS4-03 Transformation of Resource Base in Asia’s Economic Development and Its Costs: Sustainability of Local, National and Regional Nexus

Chair:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature(RIHN),Japan

Speakers:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, RIHN,Japan
    - Monsoon Asia, Industrial-Urban-Regional Nexus and Environmental Sustainability: Reflections of Asia’s Historical Experiences
  • Makoto Taniguchi,RIHN, Japan
    - Integrated Management of Energy, Water and Food Supplies in Asia: Understanding Synergies and Trade-offs of ‘Nexus’ in National and Regional Contexts
  • Satoru Kobori, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Coastal Development, Pollution Control, and Nature Conservation: An Environmental History of Yokohama, 1955–1973
  • Benjamin Bansal , National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan
    - Metropolitan Capacity: TMG and Tokyo’s Megacity Growth, 1949-1970
  • Bao Maohong , Peking University, China
    - Global environmental history of iron and steel industry in post war East Asia

Discussant:

  • Linda Grove, Harvard-Yenching Institute and U.S. Social Science Research Council, USA

Parallel DAY 1: OP5-01

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

OP5-01 Future of Regional Integration in the Globalized World

Chairs:

  • Kenji Iwata, Director of the EU Centre, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Machiko Hachiya, Advisor to the EU Centre, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Jacques Pelkmans, Centre for European Policy Studies, Belgium
    - The Future of European Integration
  • Kazushi Shimizu, Kyushu University, Japan
    - ASEAN Economic Integration in the World Economy
  • Osei Oteng-Asante, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan
    - A West African Response to Trade Integration: 1880-1940
  • Mare Ushkovska, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
    - The EU and Self-Determination: Politics of Regional Integration and Attitudes towards Independence Movements

Parallel DAY 1: CS6-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS6-02 Development of Sustainable Urban Community for Super-Aged Society

Chairs:

  • Takeo Ogawa, Non-profit Organization Asian Aging Business Center, Japan
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Shintaro Minami, Kyushu Economic Research Center, Japan

Speakers:

  • Takeo Ogawa, Non-profit Organization Asian Aging Business Center, Japan
    - Paradigm-Shifted Community for Demographic Onus Society
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - New Village Creation in Singapore: Integrated Kampung for Aging Society
  • Choo Yian Tay, Alexandra Health System, Singapore
    - Share a Pot: Brewing Stronger Communities in Singapore
  • Shintaro Minami and Naoko Haraguchi, Kyushu Economic Research Center, Japan
    - Development Process of the Community Design Method for Structuring “Otagaisama (Reciprocal) Community”

coming soon

Parallel DAY 1: CS4-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS4-03 Transformation of Resource Base in Asia’s Economic Development and Its Costs: Sustainability of Local, National and Regional Nexus

Chair:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature(RIHN),Japan

Speakers:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, RIHN,Japan
    - Monsoon Asia, Industrial-Urban-Regional Nexus and Environmental Sustainability: Reflections of Asia’s Historical Experiences
  • Makoto Taniguchi,RIHN, Japan
    - Integrated Management of Energy, Water and Food Supplies in Asia: Understanding Synergies and Trade-offs of ‘Nexus’ in National and Regional Contexts
  • Satoru Kobori, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Coastal Development, Pollution Control, and Nature Conservation: An Environmental History of Yokohama, 1955–1973
  • Benjamin Bansal , National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan
    - Metropolitan Capacity: TMG and Tokyo’s Megacity Growth, 1949-1970
  • Bao Maohong , Peking University, China
    - Global environmental history of iron and steel industry in post war East Asia

Discussant:

  • Linda Grove, Harvard-Yenching Institute and U.S. Social Science Research Council, USA

Parallel DAY 1: OP5-01

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

OP5-01 Future of Regional Integration in the Globalized World

Chairs:

  • Kenji Iwata, Director of the EU Centre, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Machiko Hachiya, Advisor to the EU Centre, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Jacques Pelkmans, Centre for European Policy Studies, Belgium
    - The Future of European Integration
  • Kazushi Shimizu, Kyushu University, Japan
    - ASEAN Economic Integration in the World Economy
  • Osei Oteng-Asante, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan
    - A West African Response to Trade Integration: 1880-1940
  • Mare Ushkovska, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
    - The EU and Self-Determination: Politics of Regional Integration and Attitudes towards Independence Movements

Parallel DAY 1: CS6-02

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS6-02 Development of Sustainable Urban Community for Super-Aged Society

Chairs:

  • Takeo Ogawa, Non-profit Organization Asian Aging Business Center, Japan
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Shintaro Minami, Kyushu Economic Research Center, Japan

Speakers:

  • Takeo Ogawa, Non-profit Organization Asian Aging Business Center, Japan
    - Paradigm-Shifted Community for Demographic Onus Society
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - New Village Creation in Singapore: Integrated Kampung for Aging Society
  • Choo Yian Tay, Alexandra Health System, Singapore
    - Share a Pot: Brewing Stronger Communities in Singapore
  • Shintaro Minami and Naoko Haraguchi, Kyushu Economic Research Center, Japan
    - Development Process of the Community Design Method for Structuring “Otagaisama (Reciprocal) Community”

Parallel DAY 1: OP7-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

OP7-03 Women’s Changing Roles: Workforce, Leadership, and Home Life

Chair:

  • Kellia Craig-Henderson, US National Science Foundation, USA

Speakers:

  • Yun Zhou, Peking University, China
    - Life and Work—An important issue to women
  • Chi Zhang, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The Impact of Childcare Availability on Maternal Employment: Variability of Impacts by Full-time and Part-time Employment
  • Mariko Ogawa, Kyushu University, Japan
    - NGO initiatives in gender equality for supporting women - through survey in the US, Canada and Japan

Discussant:

  • Emiko Usui, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Parallel DAY 1: CS8-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS8-03 Biodiversity and biomedicine: sustainability for human health

Chair:

  • Alexander Kagansky, Far Eastern Federal University of Russia, Russian Federation

Speakers:

  • Yongyuth Yuthavong, Senior Advisor to the President, National S&T Development Agency, NSTDA, Thailand Science Park, Thailand
    - Tapping Molecular Wilderness...Sustainably
  • Orakanoke Phanraksa, National Science and Technology and Development Agency, Thailand
    - The international legal instruments to safeguard biological diversity: its implications and challenges
  • Peter McGrath, Inter Academy Partnership, Italy
    - Exploring natural products and traditional medicine
  • Dilfuza Egamberdieva, National University of Uzbekistan, Uzbekistan
    - Plant microbiome as a Source of Bioactive Phytochemicals
  • Vidushi Veergheen-Bhujun, University of Mauritius, Mauritius
    -Bio2Bio, an effort from the Global Young Academy, how Mauritius and Scotland united to make an open research consortium, that led to this panel. The importance of biomedicine beyond borders in global health- A positive trend in biology, medicine and hope for the biodiversity.
  • Mauro Rebelo, Digital Forest Project, Brazil
    - Future digital approaches to fair natural resources management

Parallel DAY 1: CS9-01

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS9-01 Environmental democracy in Asia and its indicator

Chairs:

  • Noriko Okubo Date, Osaka University, Japan
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
  • Kenichiro Yanagi, Meiji University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Noriko Okubo Date, Osaka University, Japan
    - Developments on Participation Principle in Environmental Matters in Asia and Japan
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Indicators to Evaluate Progress in Participation on the Environmental Matters: Lessons Learnt from the Precedents to Elaborate Relevant Indicators
  • Michinori Uwasu, Osaka University, Japan
    - A future design perspective on environmental democracy
  • Rika Fajrini, Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), Indonesia
    - Acknowledging the Role of Indigenous People and Local Communities in Biodiversity Conservation
  • Ritwick Dutta, The Access Initiative (TAI), South Asia, India
    - Environmental Democracy and the Role of the Judiciary

Parallel DAY 1: OP7-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

OP7-03 Women’s Changing Roles: Workforce, Leadership, and Home Life

Chair:

  • Kellia Craig-Henderson, US National Science Foundation, USA

Speakers:

  • Yun Zhou, Peking University, China
    - Life and Work—An important issue to women
  • Chi Zhang, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The Impact of Childcare Availability on Maternal Employment: Variability of Impacts by Full-time and Part-time Employment
  • Mariko Ogawa, Kyushu University, Japan
    - NGO initiatives in gender equality for supporting women - through survey in the US, Canada and Japan

Discussant:

  • Emiko Usui, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Parallel DAY 1: CS8-03

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS8-03 Biodiversity and biomedicine: sustainability for human health

Chair:

  • Alexander Kagansky, Far Eastern Federal University of Russia, Russian Federation

Speakers:

  • Yongyuth Yuthavong, Senior Advisor to the President, National S&T Development Agency, NSTDA, Thailand Science Park, Thailand
    - Tapping Molecular Wilderness...Sustainably
  • Orakanoke Phanraksa, National Science and Technology and Development Agency, Thailand
    - The international legal instruments to safeguard biological diversity: its implications and challenges
  • Peter McGrath, Inter Academy Partnership, Italy
    - Exploring natural products and traditional medicine
  • Dilfuza Egamberdieva, National University of Uzbekistan, Uzbekistan
    - Plant microbiome as a Source of Bioactive Phytochemicals
  • Vidushi Veergheen-Bhujun, University of Mauritius, Mauritius
    -Bio2Bio, an effort from the Global Young Academy, how Mauritius and Scotland united to make an open research consortium, that led to this panel. The importance of biomedicine beyond borders in global health- A positive trend in biology, medicine and hope for the biodiversity.
  • Mauro Rebelo, Digital Forest Project, Brazil
    - Future digital approaches to fair natural resources management

Parallel DAY 1: CS9-01

14:30-16:30 Tuesday / 25-Sept

CS9-01 Environmental democracy in Asia and its indicator

Chairs:

  • Noriko Okubo Date, Osaka University, Japan
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
  • Kenichiro Yanagi, Meiji University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Noriko Okubo Date, Osaka University, Japan
    - Developments on Participation Principle in Environmental Matters in Asia and Japan
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Indicators to Evaluate Progress in Participation on the Environmental Matters: Lessons Learnt from the Precedents to Elaborate Relevant Indicators
  • Michinori Uwasu, Osaka University, Japan
    - A future design perspective on environmental democracy
  • Rika Fajrini, Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), Indonesia
    - Acknowledging the Role of Indigenous People and Local Communities in Biodiversity Conservation
  • Ritwick Dutta, The Access Initiative (TAI), South Asia, India
    - Environmental Democracy and the Role of the Judiciary
  • *Information of Chairs, Speakers and Presentation Titles for Parallel, Topical and Poser will be available shortly.

26-SEP / DAY 2 / PROGRAM

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY2

Securing Co-evolution of Human and Artificial Intelligence: Role of Social Science and Humanities for SDGs

Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)

Abstract:

Advancement of the emerging technology represented by Artificial Intelligence (AI) using big data is expected to bring more efficient and wealthy life for human beings in the future. It is likely to be a major agent for the enrichment of inclusive wealth, a new measure of human wealth with considerations to natural and health capital. Since the economic impact of AI is enormous, companies as well as nations have invested a huge amount of money in Research and Development (R&D) on AI and the competition becomes intense. AI has a great potential to contribute to realize SDGs as Mr. Achim Steiner, Administrator of UNDP, stated to the press in Tokyo in August 2017. The Japanese 5th Science and Technology Basic Plan adopted by the cabinet in 2016 states realization of world-leading “Super Smart Society (Society 5.0)” and AI is a key technology to make it happen and as a national funding agency, JST promotes R&D on AI.
On the other hand, it is globally pointed out that AI might bring about new issues such as new types of crime, unforeseen troubles and incidents, inequality and disparity.
It is important to discuss how we could foster a healthy development of AI from the human-centric perspective to optimize the benefit of the emerging technology and reduce its risk.
Social Science and Humanities (SSH) has been expected to play an important role in this respect. SSH provides essential knowledge to respond properly for Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) and Ethics, Legal, Social Implication (ELSI), which are requirements for R&D on AI. SSH also has a potential to contribute to promote CSV (Creating Shared Value) activities of the company.
This session will focus on the relation between human society and R&D on AI. The company CEO, SSH researchers and AI scientist will get together for this session to discuss how we could promote the harmonization and interaction between R&D on AI and human society, namely co-design and co-production of R&D beyond disciplines and social sectors for mutually sustainable development, taking into account the speed of Advancement of AI and its significant impact on people’s life. Specifically they would talk about topics such as “Would social and economic development driven by AI contribute to reduce inequality, improve people’s safety and well-being, and realize sustainable future?”, “What kind of risk would exist?, “What would be the role of SSH in the process of development of AI?”, “Would it be necessary to develop a new type of SSH researchers?” and “How could we measure the well-being of people in AI embedded society?”.
The session would also contribute to address the development of a new type of Industry-Academia collaboration, mainly conducted by SSH community, which differs from conventional business school oriented collaboration with the industry. Natural Science has been playing a dominant role in the Industry-Academia collaboration, and even where SSH plays a role, the collaboration has been active mainly in Economics and Business Administration, represented by MOT (Management of Technology) and case studies. The collaboration between Industry and SSH community other than Economics and Business Administration remains limited.
A super smart society (Society 5.0) is characterized as follows:
a society that is capable of providing the necessary goods and services to the people who need them at the required time and in just the right amount; a society that is able to respond precisely to a wide variety of social needs; a society in which all kinds of people can readily obtain high quality services, overcome differences of age, gender, region, and language, and live vigorous and comfortable lives.

Speakers:

  • Jiro Kokuryo, Vice President, Keio University and JST Program Supervisor
  • Urs Gasser, Executive Director, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
    - AI and Society: Early Observations and Evolving Agenda
  • Katsumi Emura, Executive Vice President, CTO, NEC Corporation
    - Creating a human-centered society by making maximum use of Data and Artificial Intelligence
  • Haiyuan Wu, Executive Director and Vice President, Wakayama University
    - AI Advances into Mass Society

Chair:

  • Jiro Kokuryo, Vice President, Keio University and JST Program Supervisor

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

(Re)Framing Security: Addressing Gender, Violence, and Resilience

International Sociological Association (ISA), Margaret Abraham, Elisa Reis

Abstract:

Tackling the problem of gender and violence is key to dealing with issues of equality and security. Drawing upon different situational contexts, the panelists will explore some of the key issues in situating gender, violence, vulnerabilities and resilience in the framing of human security. Not only are gender diversity and critical feminist perspectives marginal and/or absent in institutions, the distribution of social capital by gender is uneven, with women possessing less bridging and linking social capital. Collectively, these affect the social and political capacities of women to mobilize resources to materialize desired outcomes. Apart from identifying the causes, manifestations of violence and normalisation of unequal gender and power relations in everyday experiences, and reflecting on their implications for human security, the panelists will also highlight the forms of resilience, empowerment and mobilizations to counter violence, reduce vulnerabilities and bring about structural change. Focusing on environment and climate change, sexual harassment in academia, domestic violence and legal structures, the panelists will share concrete strategies/measures that researchers together with stakeholders can offer to mitigate violence, enhance gender equality and security.

Speakers:

  • Vineeta Sinha (National University of Singapore / Singapore)
    -Gender Violence and Sexual Harassment in Academia
  • Margaret Abraham (Hofstra University / USA)
    -Toward Gender Equality and Security: Mitigating Domestic Violence
  • Aisa Kiyosue (Muroran Institute of Technology / Japan)
    -Reconsidering Article 24 of the Constitution of Japan as Pacifism: Non-violent Society and Families
  • Emma Porio (Ateneo de Manila University / Philippines)
    -Gender, Social Capital and Well-Being: Building Adaptive Capacities and Climate Resilience in Disaster Prone Communities in the Philippines

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Social Policy Development in the Age of Big Data

In partnership with the International Network of Government Science Advisors (INGSA)

Abstract:

As governments have access to more data about their populations, the potential for big data to assist in social sector policy development is being realised. Big data techniques offer the opportunities to empirically explore many issues that until now have been largely addressed though normative approaches. They also can identify relationships that have previously been unsuspected. Early experience have already demonstrated that integrated data approaches can lead to important new understandings and policy approaches. However these early experiences also reveal a number of challenges. This session will explore both the opportunities and problems that have emerged.
Perhaps the biggest opportunity lies in the ‘social investment’ paradigm whereby policy makers can explore the relationships between different social domains that have traditionally been managed in policy silos. This requires a highly integrated database. Such citizen-based analytics must be informed by an intellectual framework that creates plausible models and can explore both an understanding of the systems understudy as well as exploring programme effectiveness and options. A key issue to be resolved is that of client level service provision that is necessary if big data is to be used to assess the effectiveness of particular programmes. The risks of biases in the analysis need to be understood and this will become greater as artificial intelligence is used to explore very large data sets.
Issues of social license, data privacy and integrity, data sovereignty and of the distinction to be made between policy research use and compliance uses are important. Experience to date shows that there are major challenges in data curation and in developing the policy toolbox needed to safely and optimally use big data in policy making. There is also the danger of naïve use and interpretation by politicians. A key issue is that of how data governance is established within government agencies and across government to sustain social license.

Chair:

  • Sir Peter Gluckman , Chair of INGSA, New Zealand

Speakers:

  • Madiagne Diallo, the Treasury, Senegal and INGSA Africa Executive
    - Data as an aid to policy decision making
  • Richie Poulton, the Ministry of Social Development and the Social Investment Agency, New Zealand
    - to give a general overview and discussion of the social investment approach
  • Linda Lizotte-Macpherson, former Assistant Deputy Minister and head of the school of public service in Ottawa, Canada
    - the 'demand side' of the evidence-to-policy equation

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Indigenous Studies at the Crossroads of Globalization and Settler Colonialism

Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA), Motoji Matsuda, Yoshinobu Ota

Abstract:

As signaled, in 2007, by the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples, the indigenous peoples seem to have reentered as subjects into the World History. The historical forces behind the global indigenous resurgence, are twofold: on the one hand, globalization in James Clifford’s term as “the evolving world of connectivities” and a critique of settler colonialism in Patrick Wolfe’s sense, a process of decolonization reinvented in the twenty-first century, on the other. By recognizing the present conjuncture as constituted by these complex yet opposing historical forces, this panel explores possibilities in rearticulating, from such overlapping disciplinary perspectives as history, political science, cultural studies and anthropology, the relations with the indigenous studies, a distinct field of investigation, as the body of knowledge in which meanings of such relational issues as memory, identity, reconciliation, ethics, responsibility and justice become re-opened and contested.

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda (President of Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA)) (Kyoto University; Anthropology)

Keynote Speaker:

  • James Clifford (Emeritus Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz; Cultural Theory)
    - Reflections on becoming indigenous

Speakers:

  • Hirofumi Kato (Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University; Archeology)
    - Decolonization and Indigenous archaeology
  • Yasuo Tsuji(School of Law, Hokkaido University; Political Theory)
    - Multiculturalism and revitalization of diminished culture
  • Yoshinobu Ota (Faculty of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University; Anthropology)
    - Unpacking Meanings of “Coming Home”

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

What Does Security Mean in Asia?: Mainstream and Critical Perspectives

Japanese Political Science Association (JPSA), Makoto Kobayashi

Abstract:

Security has been the core concept to constitute the formation of not only the discipline of International Relations but also social science in general. The connotation and significance of the concept is not necessarily, however, clear and it has brought many sorts of controversies. Security is sometimes considered to be a transcendental starting point with which we begin theorizing the various social relations on the one hand, but on the other hand the concept of security is often thoroughly criticized and deconstructed by some researchers opposing statism and conservatism. Security is in this sense outstandingly controversial issue when we discuss on social relations and it may become a barrier that hinders fruitful exchanges among the scholars of social sciences.
This session is organized in order to overcome this futile situation, and to gather the wide range of knowledge beyond the limited frontiers of disciplines. Our premise is that we should rethink the concept of security from a critical perspective but at the same time we should avoid the discourse to completely deny the traditional concept of national security. The concept of "human security," which is proposed to renovate the security controversy, may be useful to restart the discussion, but thus far human security seems to work as a practical tool for policy making and not for an instructive guide of investigation.
For our breakthrough of this deadlocked situation, we develop a critical debate from those three aspects: nuclear power stations, gender, and Okinawa. These items are usually treated as peripheral issues in the traditional security studies but even the traditional scholars of security have noticed that these issues are getting more and more importance when we talk of security matters. Admittedly, we cannot criticize the traditional security studies only by pointing out the significance of those new issues. Therefore, in this session, we aim at developing our critical thinking towards both traditional and radical security studies, in the line of those new type of critical security studies of recently emerging mainly in European countries. Furthermore, we will not limit our discussion in the field of security studies of International Relations, but pursue wider range of interactions over various types of borders such as domestic/international, center/periphery, male/female, political/apolitical, and public/private.

Chair:

  • Makoto Kobayashi (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan )

Speakers:

  • Hiroshi Sasaki (Niigata University of International and Information Studies /Japan)
    -“Security” of the Periphery and the Future generations: Case of the Problem of Nuclear Power Plants.
  • Ki-young, Shin (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan)
    - Gender, Political Representation and National Security Policy in Northeast Asia
  • Manabu Sato (Faculty of Law, Okinawa International University / Japan)
    - How real is realism?

Discussant:

  • Seiji Endo (Faculty of Law, Seikei University / Japan)

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Building a safer future through social progress

In partnership with International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Abstract:

Our world is facing many threats, which jeopardize the tremendous achievements of the last decades and centuries in which longevity has been almost doubled for most populations, and absolute poverty has been considerably reduced through development. Most of these threats come from problems that human societies inflict upon themselves: development gaps, inequalities, geopolitical and internal conflicts, environment degradation, microbial resistance. Even threats of a global scale like climate change can be traced to human behavior: mismanagement of energy sources and production-consumption patterns. Lack of social cohesion, and bad governance in the form of capture of decision-making by special interests, appear as key factors behind all these problems. The International Panel of Social Progress, in its First Report, argues that tackling the root causes of the current threats requires addressing the current social problems and promoting social progress more decisively. Its four speakers will talk about a security threat in connection with its social roots:

Speakers:

  • Elisa Reis (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
    - on socio-cultural conflicts and belonging
  • Vivian Lin (La Trobe University, Australia)
    - on public health threats and their roots in inequalities
  • Hideaki Shinoda (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan)
    - on peace-building and social issues
  • Ingrid Volkmer (University of Melbourne, Australia)
    - on the global public sphere in the digital age

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

(Re)Framing Security: Addressing Gender, Violence, and Resilience

Organized by: International Sociological Association (ISA), Margaret Abraham, Elisa Reis

Abstract:

Tackling the problem of gender and violence is key to dealing with issues of equality and security. Drawing upon different situational contexts, the panelists will explore some of the key issues in situating gender, violence, vulnerabilities and resilience in the framing of human security. Not only are gender diversity and critical feminist perspectives marginal and/or absent in institutions, the distribution of social capital by gender is uneven, with women possessing less bridging and linking social capital. Collectively, these affect the social and political capacities of women to mobilize resources to materialize desired outcomes. Apart from identifying the causes, manifestations of violence and normalisation of unequal gender and power relations in everyday experiences, and reflecting on their implications for human security, the panelists will also highlight the forms of resilience, empowerment and mobilizations to counter violence, reduce vulnerabilities and bring about structural change. Focusing on environment and climate change, sexual harassment in academia, domestic violence and legal structures, the panelists will share concrete strategies/measures that researchers together with stakeholders can offer to mitigate violence, enhance gender equality and security.

Speakers:

  • Vineeta Sinha (National University of Singapore / Singapore)
    -Gender Violence and Sexual Harassment in Academia
  • Margaret Abraham (Hofstra University / USA)
    -Toward Gender Equality and Security: Mitigating Domestic Violence
  • Aisa Kiyosue (Muroran Institute of Technology / Japan)
    -Reconsidering Article 24 of the Constitution of Japan as Pacifism: Non-violent Society and Families
  • Emma Porio (Ateneo de Manila University / Philippines)
    -Gender, Social Capital and Well-Being: Building Adaptive Capacities and Climate Resilience in Disaster Prone Communities in the Philippines

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Social Policy Development in the Age of Big Data

In partnership with the International Network of Government Science Advisors (INGSA)

Abstract:

As governments have access to more data about their populations, the potential for big data to assist in social sector policy development is being realised. Big data techniques offer the opportunities to empirically explore many issues that until now have been largely addressed though normative approaches. They also can identify relationships that have previously been unsuspected. Early experience have already demonstrated that integrated data approaches can lead to important new understandings and policy approaches. However these early experiences also reveal a number of challenges. This session will explore both the opportunities and problems that have emerged.
Perhaps the biggest opportunity lies in the ‘social investment’ paradigm whereby policy makers can explore the relationships between different social domains that have traditionally been managed in policy silos. This requires a highly integrated database. Such citizen-based analytics must be informed by an intellectual framework that creates plausible models and can explore both an understanding of the systems understudy as well as exploring programme effectiveness and options. A key issue to be resolved is that of client level service provision that is necessary if big data is to be used to assess the effectiveness of particular programmes. The risks of biases in the analysis need to be understood and this will become greater as artificial intelligence is used to explore very large data sets.
Issues of social license, data privacy and integrity, data sovereignty and of the distinction to be made between policy research use and compliance uses are important. Experience to date shows that there are major challenges in data curation and in developing the policy toolbox needed to safely and optimally use big data in policy making. There is also the danger of naïve use and interpretation by politicians. A key issue is that of how data governance is established within government agencies and across government to sustain social license.

Chair:

  • Sir Peter Gluckman (Chair of INGSA)

Speakers:

  • Richie Poulton (the Ministry of Social Development and the Social Investment Agency / New Zealand)
    - to give a general overview and discussion of the social investment approach
  • Ann Mettler; (European Political Strategy Center, European Commission) or Vladimir Sucha (Joint Research Centre of the European Commission)
    - Data and fairness; opportunities that big data provides to enhance the lives of citizens
  • Madiagne Diallo (the Treasury, Senegal and INGSA Africa Executive)
    - Data as an aid to policy decision making
  • Katherine Oliver (Oxford University / UK)

  • - Data – its impact on policy processes

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Indigenous Studies at the Crossroads of Globalization and Settler Colonialism

Organized by: Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA), Motoji Matsuda, Yoshinobu Ota

Abstract:

As signaled, in 2007, by the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples, the indigenous peoples seem to have reentered as subjects into the World History. The historical forces behind the global indigenous resurgence, are twofold: on the one hand, globalization in James Clifford’s term as “the evolving world of connectivities” and a critique of settler colonialism in Patrick Wolfe’s sense, a process of decolonization reinvented in the twenty-first century, on the other. By recognizing the present conjuncture as constituted by these complex yet opposing historical forces, this panel explores possibilities in rearticulating, from such overlapping disciplinary perspectives as history, political science, cultural studies and anthropology, the relations with the indigenous studies, a distinct field of investigation, as the body of knowledge in which meanings of such relational issues as memory, identity, reconciliation, ethics, responsibility and justice become re-opened and contested.

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda (President of Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA)) (Kyoto University; Anthropology)

Keynote Speaker:

  • James Clifford (Emeritus Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz; Cultural Theory)
  • - Reflections on becoming indigenous

Speakers:

  • Hirofumi Kato (Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University; Archeology)
    - Decolonization and Indigenous archaeology
  • Yasuo Tsuji(School of Law, Hokkaido University; Political Theory)
    - Multiculturalism and revitalization of diminished culture
  • Yoshinobu Ota (Faculty of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University; Anthropology)
    - Unpacking Meanings of “Coming Home”

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

What Does Security Mean in Asia?: Mainstream and Critical Perspectives

Organized by: Japanese Political Science Association (JPSA), Makoto Kobayashi

Abstract:

Security has been the core concept to constitute the formation of not only the discipline of International Relations but also social science in general. The connotation and significance of the concept is not necessarily, however, clear and it has brought many sorts of controversies. Security is sometimes considered to be a transcendental starting point with which we begin theorizing the various social relations on the one hand, but on the other hand the concept of security is often thoroughly criticized and deconstructed by some researchers opposing statism and conservatism. Security is in this sense outstandingly controversial issue when we discuss on social relations and it may become a barrier that hinders fruitful exchanges among the scholars of social sciences.
This session is organized in order to overcome this futile situation, and to gather the wide range of knowledge beyond the limited frontiers of disciplines. Our premise is that we should rethink the concept of security from a critical perspective but at the same time we should avoid the discourse to completely deny the traditional concept of national security. The concept of "human security," which is proposed to renovate the security controversy, may be useful to restart the discussion, but thus far human security seems to work as a practical tool for policy making and not for an instructive guide of investigation.
For our breakthrough of this deadlocked situation, we develop a critical debate from those three aspects: nuclear power stations, gender, and Okinawa. These items are usually treated as peripheral issues in the traditional security studies but even the traditional scholars of security have noticed that these issues are getting more and more importance when we talk of security matters. Admittedly, we cannot criticize the traditional security studies only by pointing out the significance of those new issues. Therefore, in this session, we aim at developing our critical thinking towards both traditional and radical security studies, in the line of those new type of critical security studies of recently emerging mainly in European countries. Furthermore, we will not limit our discussion in the field of security studies of International Relations, but pursue wider range of interactions over various types of borders such as domestic/international, center/periphery, male/female, political/apolitical, and public/private.

Chair:

  • Makoto Kobayashi (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan )

Speakers:

  • Hiroshi Sasaki (Niigata University of International and Information Studies /Japan)
    -“Security” of the Periphery and the Future generations: Case of the Problem of Nuclear Power Plants.
  • Ki-young, Shin (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan)
    - Gender, Political Representation and National Security Policy in Northeast Asia
  • Manabu Sato (Faculty of Law, Okinawa International University / Japan)
    - How real is realism?

Discussant:

  • Seiji Endo (Faculty of Law, Seikei University / Japan)

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Building a safer future through social progress

In partnership with International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Abstract:

Our world is facing many threats, which jeopardize the tremendous achievements of the last decades and centuries in which longevity has been almost doubled for most populations, and absolute poverty has been considerably reduced through development. Most of these threats come from problems that human societies inflict upon themselves: development gaps, inequalities, geopolitical and internal conflicts, environment degradation, microbial resistance. Even threats of a global scale like climate change can be traced to human behavior: mismanagement of energy sources and production-consumption patterns. Lack of social cohesion, and bad governance in the form of capture of decision-making by special interests, appear as key factors behind all these problems. The International Panel of Social Progress, in its First Report, argues that tackling the root causes of the current threats requires addressing the current social problems and promoting social progress more decisively. Its four speakers will talk about a security threat in connection with its social roots:

Speakers:

  • Elisa Reis (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
    - on socio-cultural conflicts and belonging
  • Vivian Lin (La Trobe University, Australia)
    - on public health threats and their roots in inequalities
  • Hideaki Shinoda (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan)
    - on peace-building and social issues
  • Ingrid Volkmer (University of Melbourne, Australia)
    - on the global public sphere in the digital age

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-01 The design for the effective implementation of the climate agreement

Chair:

  • Shiro Hori, Fukuoka University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Mitsuru Kawamoto, Keio University, Japan
    - The concept of the effectiveness in environmental treaty regimes
  • Toshiyuki Fujita, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The factors ensuring long-term cooperation in international environmental agreements
  • Hsiao-Chi Chen, National Taipei University, Taiwan
    - International environmental agreements under evolutionary mechanism of imitation and asymmetric countries
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
    - The new angle to ensure achievement of climate goals

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-13

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-13 Connecting Energy and Equity for Sustainable Futures

Chair:

  • Sara Fuller, Macquarie University, Australia

Speakers: (*Presenting Author)

  • *Andrew Chapman, Kyushu University, Japan and Benjamin McLellan, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Quantifying Social Equity in Sustainability Evaluations: Global Examples
  • *Benjamin McLellan, Kyoto University, Japan and Andrew Chapman, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Equity and Efficacy in Renewable Energy Policy: A Case Study of Australia
  • Melissa Low, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Energy Equity in Singapore
  • *Sara Fuller, Macquarie University, Australia and Daphne Mah, Lachlan Barber, Victor Lam, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
    - Understanding energy poverty in the Asia-Pacific: insights from Hong Kong
  • Shinichiro Okushima, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    - Energy poverty in Japan: from multidimensional and regional perspectives

coming soon

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-01 The design for the effective implementation of the climate agreement

Chair:

  • Shiro Hori, Fukuoka University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Mitsuru Kawamoto, Keio University, Japan
    - The concept of the effectiveness in environmental treaty regimes
  • Toshiyuki Fujita, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The factors ensuring long-term cooperation in international environmental agreements
  • Hsiao-Chi Chen, National Taipei University, Taiwan
    - International environmental agreements under evolutionary mechanism of imitation and asymmetric countries
  • Yukari Takamura, Nagoya University, Japan
    - The new angle to ensure achievement of climate goals

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-13

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-13 Connecting Energy and Equity for Sustainable Futures

Chair:

  • Sara Fuller, Macquarie University, Australia

Speakers: (*Presenting Author)

  • *Andrew Chapman, Kyushu University, Japan and Benjamin McLellan, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Quantifying Social Equity in Sustainability Evaluations: Global Examples
  • *Benjamin McLellan, Kyoto University, Japan and Andrew Chapman, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Equity and Efficacy in Renewable Energy Policy: A Case Study of Australia
  • Melissa Low, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Energy Equity in Singapore
  • *Sara Fuller, Macquarie University, Australia and Daphne Mah, Lachlan Barber, Victor Lam, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
    - Understanding energy poverty in the Asia-Pacific: insights from Hong Kong
  • Shinichiro Okushima, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    - Energy poverty in Japan: from multidimensional and regional perspectives

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: OP3-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP3-01 Climate Change and Human Security

Chair:

  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University – Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan

Speakers:

  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University – Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan
    - Climate change and human security: conceptualization in the IPCC reports
  • Andrew DeWit, Rikkyo University, Japan
    - Japan’s Integrated Approach to Enhancing Human Security
  • Gusti Ayu Surtiari, United Nations University – Institute for the Environment and Human Security, Germany
    - Pressure on climate change impact and social conflict: case study of Jakarta adaptation planning, Indonesia
  • Chinmoy Sarkar, University of North Bengal, India
    - Dynamics of Climate Change, Migration and Human Security in South Asia: A Case Study of India, Bangladesh and Nepal
  • Laely Nurhidayah, Institute of Sciences, Indonesia
    - Sea Level Rise (SLR) and its implication on Human Security in Indonesia: A Social Justice Approach

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: OP4-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP4-01 Transformation in coastal zones: Coping with global change

Chairs:

  • Silja Klepp, Kiel University, Germany
  • Barbara Neumann, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies(IASS), Potsdam, Germany

Speakers:(*Presenting Author)

  • Yuhei Murakami, The Ocean Policy Research Institute, the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, Japan
    - Access to marine resources and the role of fishers’ associations: focusing on the Japanese coastal communities
  • Md Mizanur Rahman, Bangladesh Public Administration Training Centre, Bangladesh
    - The pros and cons of co-management: a case study from the Sundarban Delta
  • Mohammad Aminur Rahman, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia
    - Role of Embankments in Transforming Communities in the South-West Coastal Region of Bangladesh

Discussant:

  • Barbara Neumann, IASS, Potsdam, Germany

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-01 Negotiating States in War-torn Societies: A Structural Analysis based on Poll Surveys of Syria, Iraq, and Bosnia

Chair:

  • Dai Yamao, Kyushu University, Japan

Moderator:

  • Mitsugi Endo, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Speakers:

  • Kota Suechika, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Reconfiguration of a ‘State’ in Syria under Conflict: Poll Survey Data Analysis
  • Keiichi Kubo, Waseda University, Japan
    - Is Bosnia still a state torn apart? - An analysis of the 2017 poll survey data
  • Dai Yamao, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Negotiating multi-vectored state image in fighting state enemy in Iraq

Discussant:

  • Damir Kapidžić, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia- Herzegovina
  • Mitsugi Endo, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: OP3-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP3-01 Climate Change and Human Security

Chair:

  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University – Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan

Speakers:

  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University – Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan
    - Climate change and human security: conceptualization in the IPCC reports
  • Andrew DeWit, Rikkyo University, Japan
    - Japan’s Integrated Approach to Enhancing Human Security
  • Gusti Ayu Surtiari, United Nations University – Institute for the Environment and Human Security, Germany
    - Pressure on climate change impact and social conflict: case study of Jakarta adaptation planning, Indonesia
  • Chinmoy Sarkar, University of North Bengal, India
    - Dynamics of Climate Change, Migration and Human Security in South Asia: A Case Study of India, Bangladesh and Nepal
  • Laely Nurhidayah, Institute of Sciences, Indonesia
    - Sea Level Rise (SLR) and its implication on Human Security in Indonesia: A Social Justice Approach

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: OP4-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP4-01 Transformation in coastal zones: Coping with global change

Chairs:

  • Silja Klepp, Kiel University, Germany
  • Barbara Neumann, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies(IASS), Potsdam, Germany

Speakers:(*Presenting Author)

  • Yuhei Murakami, The Ocean Policy Research Institute, the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, Japan
    - Access to marine resources and the role of fishers’ associations: focusing on the Japanese coastal communities
  • Md Mizanur Rahman, Bangladesh Public Administration Training Centre, Bangladesh
    - The pros and cons of co-management: a case study from the Sundarban Delta
  • Mohammad Aminur Rahman, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia
    - Role of Embankments in Transforming Communities in the South-West Coastal Region of Bangladesh

Discussant:

  • Barbara Neumann, IASS, Potsdam, Germany

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-01 Negotiating States in War-torn Societies: A Structural Analysis based on Poll Surveys of Syria, Iraq, and Bosnia

Chair:

  • Dai Yamao, Kyushu University, Japan

Moderator:

  • Mitsugi Endo, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Speakers:

  • Kota Suechika, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Reconfiguration of a ‘State’ in Syria under Conflict: Poll Survey Data Analysis
  • Keiichi Kubo, Waseda University, Japan
    - Is Bosnia still a state torn apart? - An analysis of the 2017 poll survey data
  • Dai Yamao, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Negotiating multi-vectored state image in fighting state enemy in Iraq

Discussant:

  • Damir Kapidžić, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia- Herzegovina
  • Mitsugi Endo, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-08

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-08 Asia in the Anthropocene

Chair:

  • Daniel Niles, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Daniel Niles, RIHN, Japan
    - Confronting the Anthropocene in Asia
  • Masahiro Terada, RIHN, Japan
    - History or Evolution? The narrative of the Anthropocene and the concept of Naru/Becoming
  • Ka-ming Wu, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    - Consumption in the circular economy: Techno-logistics, sustainability and Chinese cities in the Anthropocene
  • Rohan D’Souza, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Are environmental histories of South Asia still possible in the epoch of the Anthropocene?

Discussants:

  • Sander van der Leeuw , Arizona State University, USA
  • Kaoru Sugihara, RIHN, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: OP5-03

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP5-03 Crafting Heritage in Asia: Origins, Issues, and Policy Impact

Chair:

  • Cynthea J. Bogel, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Hongnam Kim, Professor Emerita, Ewha Womans University, Korea
    - Crafting Heritage in Korea: Issues and Planning
  • Anton Schweizer, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Conserving Impermanence: Transcultural Approaches to Architectural Lacquering
  • Laurel Kendall, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University, USA
    - Split-Bamboo Comb: Heritage versus Living Memory?
  • Ayami Nakatani, Okayama University, Japan
    - Negotiating identities, securing income: Politics and economics of cultural heritage for village weavers in Eastern Indonesia
  • Cynthea J. Bogel, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Heritage Values, Policies, and the Crafting of Impermanence

Parallel DAY 2: CS6-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS6-01 Growing Bigger and more Accurate with GSBPM (part two)

Chair:

  • Eka Irianti, Subulus Salam Statistical Office, Indonesia

Speakers:

  • Laura Intan Fadilah, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Establishment Approach Frame Creation in Region
  • Tudzla Hernita, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Design of Probability Sampling for District by Respective District
  • Aulia Dini, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Establishment Approach Survey to Update Household Approach Survey
  • Eka Irianti, Subulus Salam Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Household Consumption with Respect to Productive Age Group

Parallel DAY 2: CS8-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS8-01 Aging and Health Issues in Asia

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- Asia Development Bank Institute (ADBI)

Chair:

  • Peter Morgan, Asia Development Bank Institute (ADBI), Japan

Keynote:

  • Naoyuki Yoshino, Dean, ADBI, Japan
    - Declined Effectiveness of Fiscal and Monetary Policies Faced with Aging Population and Pension Asset Management

Speakers:

  • Matthias Helble, ADBI
    - Measuring the Costs of Overweight and Obesity in Asia and the Pacific
  • Peter Morgan, ADBI
    - Costs and Potential Funding of Expanded Public Pension Coverage in Asia
  • Bihong Huang, ADBI
    - Population aging and inequality: evidence from China
  • Saumik Paul, ADBI
    - Industrialization-led displacement and long-term welfare: evidence from West Bengal

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-08

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-08 Asia in the Anthropocene

Chair:

  • Daniel Niles, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Daniel Niles, RIHN, Japan
    - Confronting the Anthropocene in Asia
  • Masahiro Terada, RIHN, Japan
    - History or Evolution? The narrative of the Anthropocene and the concept of Naru/Becoming
  • Ka-ming Wu, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    - Consumption in the circular economy: Techno-logistics, sustainability and Chinese cities in the Anthropocene
  • Rohan D’Souza, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Are environmental histories of South Asia still possible in the epoch of the Anthropocene?

Discussants:

  • Sander van der Leeuw , Arizona State University, USA
  • Kaoru Sugihara, RIHN, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: OP5-03

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP5-03 Crafting Heritage in Asia: Origins, Issues, and Policy Impact

Chair:

  • Cynthea J. Bogel, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Hongnam Kim, Professor Emerita, Ewha Womans University, Korea
    - Crafting Heritage in Korea: Issues and Planning
  • Anton Schweizer, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Conserving Impermanence: Transcultural Approaches to Architectural Lacquering
  • Laurel Kendall, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University, USA
    - Split-Bamboo Comb: Heritage versus Living Memory?
  • Ayami Nakatani, Okayama University, Japan
    - Negotiating identities, securing income: Politics and economics of cultural heritage for village weavers in Eastern Indonesia
  • Cynthea J. Bogel, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Heritage Values, Policies, and the Crafting of Impermanence

Parallel DAY 2: CS6-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS6-01 Growing Bigger and more Accurate with GSBPM (part two)

Chair:

  • Eka Irianti, Subulus Salam Statistical Office, Indonesia

Speakers:

  • Laura Intan Fadilah, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Establishment Approach Frame Creation in Region
  • Tudzla Hernita, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Design of Probability Sampling for District by Respective District
  • Aulia Dini, National Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Establishment Approach Survey to Update Household Approach Survey
  • Eka Irianti, Subulus Salam Statistical Office, Indonesia
    - Household Consumption with Respect to Productive Age Group

Parallel DAY 2: CS8-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS8-01 Aging and Health Issues in Asia

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- Asia Development Bank Institute (ADBI)

Chair:

  • Peter Morgan, Asia Development Bank Institute (ADBI), Japan

Keynote:

  • Naoyuki Yoshino, Dean, ADBI, Japan
    - Declined Effectiveness of Fiscal and Monetary Policies Faced with Aging Population and Pension Asset Management

Speakers:

  • Matthias Helble, ADBI
    - Measuring the Costs of Overweight and Obesity in Asia and the Pacific
  • Peter Morgan, ADBI
    - Costs and Potential Funding of Expanded Public Pension Coverage in Asia
  • Bihong Huang, ADBI
    - Population aging and inequality: evidence from China
  • Saumik Paul, ADBI
    - Industrialization-led displacement and long-term welfare: evidence from West Bengal

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: OP9-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP-9-01 Freedom in Practice: Governance, Autonomy and Liberty in the Everyday

Chair:

  • Moises Lino e Silva, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil

Speakers:

  • Asligul Berktay, NYU Shanghai
    -“Africanness” as the Main Shaper of Identity in a Porous and Fluid World of Enslavement and Freedom
  • Orelaja Olabode, University of Lagos, Nigeria
    - The Safety- Freedom Complex: The Militarization of Urban Public Space in Lagos
  • Diana Sanchez-Betancourt, Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
    - Freedom, Governance and Citizen Engagement; Reflections from Cape Town, South Africa
  • Siarhei Hruntou, Center for the Belarusian Culture, Language and Literature Studies of the NAS of Belarus, Belarus
    - Free to commemorate: the Belarusian Day of the Dead between tradition, church and state
  • Moises Lino e Silva, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil
    -“Don’t mess with my fags!” - said the drug lord: queer liberation in a Brazilian favela

coming soon

Parallel DAY 2: OP9-01

14:00-16:00 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP-9-01 Freedom in Practice: Governance, Autonomy and Liberty in the Everyday

Chair:

  • Moises Lino e Silva, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil

Speakers:

  • Asligul Berktay, NYU Shanghai
    -“Africanness” as the Main Shaper of Identity in a Porous and Fluid World of Enslavement and Freedom
  • Orelaja Olabode, University of Lagos, Nigeria
    - The Safety- Freedom Complex: The Militarization of Urban Public Space in Lagos
  • Diana Sanchez-Betancourt, Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa
    - Freedom, Governance and Citizen Engagement; Reflections from Cape Town, South Africa
  • Siarhei Hruntou, Center for the Belarusian Culture, Language and Literature Studies of the NAS of Belarus, Belarus
    - Free to commemorate: the Belarusian Day of the Dead between tradition, church and state
  • Moises Lino e Silva, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil
    -“Don’t mess with my fags!” - said the drug lord: queer liberation in a Brazilian favela

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-06

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-06 Future Design: A New Framework for the Transformation to Sustainable Societies

Chair:

  • Tatsuyoshi Saijo, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) and Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan

Speakers:

  • Tatsuyoshi Saijo, RIHN and Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Future Design: An Overview
  • Keishiro Hara, Osaka University, Japan
    - Creating imaginary future generations for reconciling intergenerational conflicts Evidence from participatory deliberation practices
  • Shibly Shahrier, BRAC University, Bangladesh
    - Intergenerational sustainability dilemma and a potential solution: Future ahead and back mechanism
  • Raja Timilsina, Research Center for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Can deliberative democracy resolve intergenerational sustainability dilemma?
  • Ryuta Aoki, Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Neuro future design and its prospects

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-07

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-07 Intergenerational co-creation to achieve sustainable and inclusive development

Chair:

  • Takashi Omori, The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Japan

<Presentaions>

Speakers:

  • Ryuzo Furukawa, Tokyo City University, Japan
    - Challenging lifestyle changes under severe environmental constraints through combining methods of backcasting and interviews with elderly
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Intergenerational approach for rainwater management
  • Yukiko Uchida, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Happiness and social capital: social psychological perspectives for sustainable societies, with Happiness Indices for Communities (HICS)
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Promoting intergenerational programs and co-locations of cross-age services for sustainable intergenerational understanding: the case of Singapore

<Panel Discussion>

Coordinator:

  • Takashi Omori, The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX), JST, Japan

Panelists:

  • Ryuzo Furukawa, Tokyo City University, Japan
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Yukiko Uchida, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Yoshika Yamamoto, Heian Jogakuin (St.Agnes') University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-11

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-11 The Belmont Forum–NORFACE Transformations to Sustainability programme: Re-structuring the field of sustainability research for sustainable and secure futures

Moderator:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, The Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
  • 1. Opening address: NORFACE/Belmont Forum representative
  • 2. Keynote Speech: Melissa Leach, Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Univ. of Sussex, UK
  • 3. Panel of research project leaders: Leaders from 12 T2S projects
  • 4. Discussion with audience
  • 5. Synthesis by Melissa Leach

Parallel DAY 2: OP1-01

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP1-01 Arctic Geopolitics and Climate Change

In Commemoration of the Completion of Ito Campus, Kyushu University

Chair:

  • Hyunjoo Naomi Chi, Hokkaido University, Japan

Moderator:

  • Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Minsu Kim, Korea Maritime Institute, Korea
    -Development of Korea’s Arctic Policy: the role as a ‘Responsible Arctic Partner’
  • Tony Tai-Ting Liu, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Arctic Policy with Chinese Characteristics: The Polar Silk Road Initiative and Its Geopolitical Implications
  • Xu Liu, Renmin University of China, China
    -The Ice Silk Road Initiative and Its implication for the Arctic Governance
  • Fujio Ohnishi, Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University , Japan
    -Development of Japan’s Arctic Policy: The Third Basic Plan for Ocean Policy
  • Minori Takahashi, Slavic-Eurasian Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan
    -The emergence of Cold-War-like power relations in the post-Cold War era and their influence on sub-state actors in the Arctic: Thule Air Base as the study case

Discussant:

  • Martin van der Velde, Netherlands

---In Partnership with Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-06

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-06 Future Design: A New Framework for the Transformation to Sustainable Societies

Chair:

  • Tatsuyoshi Saijo, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) and Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan

Speakers:

  • Tatsuyoshi Saijo, RIHN and Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Future Design: An Overview
  • Keishiro Hara, Osaka University, Japan
    - Creating imaginary future generations for reconciling intergenerational conflicts Evidence from participatory deliberation practices
  • Shibly Shahrier, BRAC University, Bangladesh
    - Intergenerational sustainability dilemma and a potential solution: Future ahead and back mechanism
  • Raja Timilsina, Research Center for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Can deliberative democracy resolve intergenerational sustainability dilemma?
  • Ryuta Aoki, Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Japan
    - Neuro future design and its prospects

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-07

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-07 Intergenerational co-creation to achieve sustainable and inclusive development

Chair:

  • Takashi Omori, The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Japan

<Presentaions>

Speakers:

  • Ryuzo Furukawa, Tokyo City University, Japan
    - Challenging lifestyle changes under severe environmental constraints through combining methods of backcasting and interviews with elderly
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Intergenerational approach for rainwater management
  • Yukiko Uchida, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Happiness and social capital: social psychological perspectives for sustainable societies, with Happiness Indices for Communities (HICS)
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Promoting intergenerational programs and co-locations of cross-age services for sustainable intergenerational understanding: the case of Singapore

<Panel Discussion>

Coordinator:

  • Takashi Omori, The Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society (RISTEX), JST, Japan

Panelists:

  • Ryuzo Furukawa, Tokyo City University, Japan
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Yukiko Uchida, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Leng Leng Thang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Yoshika Yamamoto, Heian Jogakuin (St.Agnes') University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS1-11

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS1-11 The Belmont Forum–NORFACE Transformations to Sustainability programme: Re-structuring the field of sustainability research for sustainable and secure futures

Moderator:

  • Kaoru Sugihara, The Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
  • 1. Opening address: NORFACE/Belmont Forum representative
  • 2. Keynote Speech: Melissa Leach, Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Univ. of Sussex, UK
  • 3. Panel of research project leaders: Leaders from 12 T2S projects
  • 4. Discussion with audience
  • 5. Synthesis by Melissa Leach

Parallel DAY 2: OP1-01

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

OP1-01 Arctic Geopolitics and Climate Change

In Commemoration of the Completion of Ito Campus, Kyushu University

Chair:

  • Hyunjoo Naomi Chi, Hokkaido University, Japan

Moderator:

  • Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Minsu Kim, Korea Maritime Institute, Korea
    -Development of Korea’s Arctic Policy: the role as a ‘Responsible Arctic Partner’
  • Tony Tai-Ting Liu, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Arctic Policy with Chinese Characteristics: The Polar Silk Road Initiative and Its Geopolitical Implications
  • Xu Liu, Renmin University of China, China
    -The Ice Silk Road Initiative and Its implication for the Arctic Governance
  • Fujio Ohnishi, Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University , Japan
    -Development of Japan’s Arctic Policy: The Third Basic Plan for Ocean Policy
  • Minori Takahashi, Slavic-Eurasian Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan
    -The emergence of Cold-War-like power relations in the post-Cold War era and their influence on sub-state actors in the Arctic: Thule Air Base as the study case

Discussant:

  • Martin van der Velde, Netherlands

---In Partnership with Arctic Research Center, Hokkaido University

Parallel DAY 2: CS3-08

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS3-08 What happens when those responsible for public security become perpetrators or targets?

Chair:

  • Kaizô Iwakami Beltrão, Escola Brasileira de Administração Pública e de Empresas (EBAPE/FGV)

Speakers:

  • Minoru Yokoyama, Kokugakuin University, Japan
    - How Has Police Power Been Used in Japan?
  • Alejandro Aguirre , El Colegio de México
    - Authorities as perpetrators and targets of violence in Mexico
  • Kaizô Iwakami Beltrão, EBAPE/FGV
    - State crimes: Deaths by police officers in the Brazilian states of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Bahia - 1996/2015.

Parallel DAY 2: CS4-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS4-02 Integrating and mobilizing local cultural perspectives into financing of 2030 Agenda: Security and equity for sustainable future

Chair:

  • Nuri Birtek, Association of National Development Finance Institutions in Member Countries of the Islamic Development Bank (ADFIMI), Turkey

Speakers:

  • Murat Ali Yulek, Istanbul Commerce University, Turkey
    - Financing in Africa for Sustainable Development
  • Huseyin Ozturk, Economic Advisor to Embassy of Republic of Turkey in Tokyo, Japan
    - Does Islamic Banking Offer a Natural Hedge for Business Cycles? Evidence from a Dual Banking System
  • K. Ali Akkemik, Yamaguchi University, Japan
    - The relation between trust and happiness: a comparison of China, India, Japan, Turkey, and US
  • Yoshihisa Godo, Meiji Gakuin University, Japan
    - Foreign Nationals as Care Workers in Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS4-07

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS4-07 Building a new food economy in Japan through sharing, collaboration, and commoning

Chairs:

  • Christoph D. D. Rupprecht, FEAST Project, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
  • Steven R. McGreevy, RIHN, Japan

Speakers:

  • Ayako Kawai, Australian National University, Australia
    - Informal management and sharing of seeds in Japan
  • Yuta Uchiyama*, Tohoku University, Japan and Ryo Kohsaka ,Tohoku University
    - Non-market food provisioning services via communal sharing and use of Geographical Indications in satoyama socio-ecological production landscapes on Japan's Noto peninsula
  • Naomi Shimpo ,Tsukuba University, Japan
    - Grow and share our food in neighborhoods: Some case studies on community gardens in Japan, New Zealand and Germany
  • Chris Berthelsen, A Small Lab, New Zealand
    - Improvising a Delicious Landscape with Resources at Hand Experiments with Fruit, Weeds, Clay, and Junk in Tokyo and Auckland
  • Mai Kobayashi and Takanori Oishi, RIHN, Japan
    - The informal food economy of Tsushima Island

≪*presenting author≫

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-02 Protection and Promotion of Heritage and the Diversity of Cultural Expressions to Foster Culture of Belongings in Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS) under Globalization and Climate Change

Chair and Moderator:

  • Akatsuki TAKAHASHI, UNESCO Office for the Pacific States, Samoa

Speakers:

  • Larry Raigetal, Waa’gey, Federated States of Micronesia
    - Looking for Alternate Solution in the Pacific Islands under Globalisation and Climate Change
  • Sandy Morrison, University of Waikato, New Zealand (TBC)
    - Valuing Intangible Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Change Education: Case Studies from the South Pacific
  • Tomo Ishimura, Tokyo National research Institute for Cultural Properties (UNRICP), Japan
    - Safeguarding Cultural Heritage in the Pacific: Current Issues and Perspectives
  • Akatsuki Takahashi, UNESCO Office for the Pacific States, Samoa
    - Safeguarding Heritage and Fostering Creativity for the Wellbeing of Community and Sustainable Development in the Pacific
  • Yuji Kurihara, International Council of Museum (ICOM) Asia/ Pacific Alliance, Japan
    - Museums as Cultural Hub in Globalised World

Discussant:

  • Matori Yamamoto, Hosei University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS3-08

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS3-08 What happens when those responsible for public security become perpetrators or targets?

Chair:

  • Kaizô Iwakami Beltrão, Escola Brasileira de Administração Pública e de Empresas (EBAPE/FGV)

Speakers:

  • Minoru Yokoyama, Kokugakuin University, Japan
    - How Has Police Power Been Used in Japan?
  • Alejandro Aguirre , El Colegio de México
    - Authorities as perpetrators and targets of violence in Mexico
  • Kaizô Iwakami Beltrão, EBAPE/FGV
    - State crimes: Deaths by police officers in the Brazilian states of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Bahia - 1996/2015.

Parallel DAY 2: CS4-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS4-02 Integrating and mobilizing local cultural perspectives into financing of 2030 Agenda: Security and equity for sustainable future

Chair:

  • Nuri Birtek, Association of National Development Finance Institutions in Member Countries of the Islamic Development Bank (ADFIMI), Turkey

Speakers:

  • Murat Ali Yulek, Istanbul Commerce University, Turkey
    - Financing in Africa for Sustainable Development
  • Huseyin Ozturk, Economic Advisor to Embassy of Republic of Turkey in Tokyo, Japan
    - Does Islamic Banking Offer a Natural Hedge for Business Cycles? Evidence from a Dual Banking System
  • K. Ali Akkemik, Yamaguchi University, Japan
    - The relation between trust and happiness: a comparison of China, India, Japan, Turkey, and US
  • Yoshihisa Godo, Meiji Gakuin University, Japan
    - Foreign Nationals as Care Workers in Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS4-07

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS4-07 Building a new food economy in Japan through sharing, collaboration, and commoning

Chairs:

  • Christoph D. D. Rupprecht, FEAST Project, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
  • Steven R. McGreevy, RIHN, Japan

Speakers:

  • Ayako Kawai, Australian National University, Australia
    - Informal management and sharing of seeds in Japan
  • Yuta Uchiyama*, Tohoku University, Japan and Ryo Kohsaka ,Tohoku University
    - Non-market food provisioning services via communal sharing and use of Geographical Indications in satoyama socio-ecological production landscapes on Japan's Noto peninsula
  • Naomi Shimpo ,Tsukuba University, Japan
    - Grow and share our food in neighborhoods: Some case studies on community gardens in Japan, New Zealand and Germany
  • Chris Berthelsen, A Small Lab, New Zealand
    - Improvising a Delicious Landscape with Resources at Hand Experiments with Fruit, Weeds, Clay, and Junk in Tokyo and Auckland
  • Mai Kobayashi and Takanori Oishi, RIHN, Japan
    - The informal food economy of Tsushima Island

≪*presenting author≫

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-02 Protection and Promotion of Heritage and the Diversity of Cultural Expressions to Foster Culture of Belongings in Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS) under Globalization and Climate Change

Chair and Moderator:

  • Akatsuki TAKAHASHI, UNESCO Office for the Pacific States, Samoa

Speakers:

    • Larry Raigetal, Waa’gey, Federated States of Micronesia
      - Looking for Alternate Solution in the Pacific Islands under Globalisation and Climate Change
    • Sandy Morrison, University of Waikato, New Zealand (TBC)
      - Valuing Intangible Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Change Education: Case Studies from the South Pacific
    • Tomo Ishimura, Tokyo National research Institute for Cultural Properties (UNRICP), Japan
      - Safeguarding Cultural Heritage in the Pacific: Current Issues and Perspectives
    • Akatsuki Takahashi, UNESCO Office for the Pacific States, Samoa
      - Safeguarding Heritage and Fostering Creativity for the Wellbeing of Community and Sustainable Development in the Pacific
    • Yuji Kurihara, International Council of Museum (ICOM) Asia/ Pacific Alliance, Japan
      - Museums as Cultural Hub in Globalised World

    Discussant:

    • Matori Yamamoto, Hosei University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-09

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-09 Africa in the world: Migration and resilience

Chairs:

  • Crain Soudien, Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa
  • Godwin Murunga, the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Senegal

Speakers:

  • Ibrahim Abdullah, University of Sierra Leone, Sierra Leone
    - Reframing the Migration/Resilience Dialectic: A Dissenting View
  • Chris Nshimbi, Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, University of Pretoria, South Africa
    - Migration governance in Africa and the regional economic communities: An Appraisal

Discussants:

  • N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba, the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University, USA
  • Adeoye O Akinola, University of Zululand, South Africa

Parallel DAY 2: CS6-03

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS6-03 Issue-driven and solution-oriented co-creation of knowledge partnering with marginalized people under poverty conditions

Chairs:

  • Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
  • Dorotea Agnes Rampisela, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia
  • Bosco Rusuwa, University of Malawi, Malawi

Speakers:

  • Hiroki Kasamatsu*, Ehime University, Japan, Masayuki Sakakibara, Ehime University, Japan, Katsuya Tanaka, Shiga University, Japan, Satoru Komatsu, Nagasaki University, Japan and Motoko Shimagami, Ehime University, Japan
    - Transdisciplinary approaches for creating innovative livelihood alternatives in high environmental loading areas affected by mercury pollution in Indonesia
  • Dorotea Agnes Rampisela, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia
    - Innovative social systems to deliver water to the most vulnerable downstream farmers of irrigation channels in southern Sulawesi
  • Hidetomo Tajima*, Tajima Labo Co., Ltd., Japan, Shion Takemura, Japan Fisheries Research & Education Agency(FRA), Japan, Juri Hori, Kyoto University, Japan, Mitsutaku Makino, FRA, Japan and Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
    - Sustainable Development Toolbox: an attempt to integrate autonomous innovations emerging from marginalized people to provide options to improve well-being and sustainability

≪*presenting author≫

Discussants: ---Discussion inviting three innovators/translators from Malawi and Thailand

  • John Banana Mataware, Founding member of Cape Maclear Tour-guide Association, Malawi
  • Brighten Ndawala, Founder and manager of Sinthana project, Malawi
  • Sudarat Sangkum, World Wide Fund for Nature(WWF), Thailand

Parallel DAY 2: CS7-01

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS7-01 Gender matters to national, social, human security

Chair:

  • Endo Kaoru, Gakushuin University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Mari Osawa ,The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Poverty Reduction is a Vital Way of ‘Investment in Society’
  • Chizuko Ueno, The University of Tokyo; Women’s Action Network, Japan
    - Equal Representation for What? : a Goal or a Tool?
  • Kimio Ito ,Kyoto-Sangyo University, Japan
    - Construction of militarised Masculinity
  • Hiroko Takeda ,Nagoya University, UK
    - Demographic and Life Style Changes, the Institutional Reforms and State-led Moral Panics
  • Kaoru Kanai*, Saitama University, Japan and Ki-young Shin, Ochanomizu University, Korea〔*presenting author〕
    - Feminization of Life insurance and Women’s Survival Strategy in Japan and Korea

Moderator:

  • Ayami Nakatani, Okayama University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS9-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS9-02 East Asia's Contested Security order

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- La Trobe University

Chair:

  • Nick Bisley, La Trobe Asia, La Trobe University, Australia

Keynote:

  • Nick Bisley, La Trobe Asia, La Trobe University, Australia
    - Asia’s Regional Security Order: Rules, Power and Order

Speakers:

  • Rebecca Strating, La Trobe University
    - Maritime disputes, sovereignty and the rules-based order in East Asia
  • Ian Hall, Griffith University, Australia
    - Asia’s Regional Security Order: India’s Perspective
  • Nobuhiro Aizawa, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Surviving strategy and its politics in a changing Asian security order: Perspectives from a regional middle power
  • Chisako Masuo ,Kyushu University, Japan
    - The new a How to Achieve “Peace” in Asia?: Contradicting but Corresponding Views from Japan and China

Parallel DAY 2: CS5-09

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS5-09 Africa in the world: Migration and resilience

Chairs:

  • Crain Soudien, Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa
  • Godwin Murunga, the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Senegal

Speakers:

  • Ibrahim Abdullah, University of Sierra Leone, Sierra Leone
    - Reframing the Migration/Resilience Dialectic: A Dissenting View
  • Chris Nshimbi, Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, University of Pretoria, South Africa
    - Migration governance in Africa and the regional economic communities: An Appraisal

Discussants:

  • N’Dri Therese Assie-Lumumba, the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University, USA
  • Adeoye O Akinola, University of Zululand, South Africa

Parallel DAY 2: CS6-03

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS6-03 Issue-driven and solution-oriented co-creation of knowledge partnering with marginalized people under poverty conditions

Chairs:

  • Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
  • Dorotea Agnes Rampisela, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia
  • Bosco Rusuwa, University of Malawi, Malawi

Speakers:

  • Hiroki Kasamatsu*, Ehime University, Japan, Masayuki Sakakibara, Ehime University, Japan, Katsuya Tanaka, Shiga University, Japan, Satoru Komatsu, Nagasaki University, Japan and Motoko Shimagami, Ehime University, Japan
    - Transdisciplinary approaches for creating innovative livelihood alternatives in high environmental loading areas affected by mercury pollution in Indonesia
  • Dorotea Agnes Rampisela, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia
    - Innovative social systems to deliver water to the most vulnerable downstream farmers of irrigation channels in southern Sulawesi
  • Hidetomo Tajima*, Tajima Labo Co., Ltd., Japan, Shion Takemura, Japan Fisheries Research & Education Agency(FRA), Japan, Juri Hori, Kyoto University, Japan, Mitsutaku Makino, FRA, Japan and Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
    - Sustainable Development Toolbox: an attempt to integrate autonomous innovations emerging from marginalized people to provide options to improve well-being and sustainability

≪*presenting author≫

Discussants: ---Discussion inviting three innovators/translators from Malawi and Thailand

  • John Banana Mataware, Founding member of Cape Maclear Tour-guide Association, Malawi
  • Brighten Ndawala, Founder and manager of Sinthana project, Malawi
  • Sudarat Sangkum, World Wide Fund for Nature(WWF), Thailand

Parallel DAY 2: CS7-01

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS7-01 Gender matters to national, social, human security

Chair:

  • Endo Kaoru, Gakushuin University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Mari Osawa ,The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Poverty Reduction is a Vital Way of ‘Investment in Society’
  • Chizuko Ueno, The University of Tokyo; Women’s Action Network, Japan
    - Equal Representation for What? : a Goal or a Tool?
  • Kimio Ito ,Kyoto-Sangyo University, Japan
    - Construction of militarised Masculinity
  • Hiroko Takeda ,Nagoya University, UK
    - Demographic and Life Style Changes, the Institutional Reforms and State-led Moral Panics
  • Kaoru Kanai*, Saitama University, Japan and Ki-young Shin, Ochanomizu University, Korea〔*presenting author〕
    - Feminization of Life insurance and Women’s Survival Strategy in Japan and Korea

Moderator:

  • Ayami Nakatani, Okayama University, Japan

Parallel DAY 2: CS9-02

16:30-18:30 Wednesday / 26-Sept

CS9-02 East Asia's Contested Security order

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- La Trobe University

Chair:

  • Nick Bisley, La Trobe Asia, La Trobe University, Australia

Keynote:

  • Nick Bisley, La Trobe Asia, La Trobe University, Australia
    - Asia’s Regional Security Order: Rules, Power and Order

Speakers:

  • Rebecca Strating, La Trobe University
    - Maritime disputes, sovereignty and the rules-based order in East Asia
  • Ian Hall, Griffith University, Australia
    - Asia’s Regional Security Order: India’s Perspective
  • Nobuhiro Aizawa, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Surviving strategy and its politics in a changing Asian security order: Perspectives from a regional middle power
  • Chisako Masuo ,Kyushu University, Japan
    - The new a How to Achieve “Peace” in Asia?: Contradicting but Corresponding Views from Japan and China

coming soon

coming soon

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
18:30-20:00

Plenary Evening DAY2

Inclusive Wealth and Security

Kyushu University

Abstract:

Many agencies, including the World Bank, UNEP, OECD, and UN Statistical Division remain actively engaged in wealth accounting projects. While such projects may differ in their semantic label or main focus, the institutions overseeing them aim to meet constant international demands for data and information related to wealth accounting and developmental measurement. Among these undertakings, recent Inclusive Wealth Reports (IWR) have been well-received in countries throughout South America, Central America, Africa and Asia for their assessments of the three forms of capital inherent in the overall wealth of nations.
In order to make the IWR more expansive, the 2018 edition (just finished now and will be published in 2018) further emphasize the linkages between scientific data and policies and highlight policy implications at local, national, and regional levels. To date, a lack of data availability among project contributors has been a considerable obstacle to creating a more comprehensive report.
Throughout the construction of IWR 2018, priority is placed on extending the outreach activities among project contributors to include greater numbers of organizational collaborators from around the world. IWR 2018 thus be forged through ample, global, multilateral data sharing and operational collaboration.

Speakers:

  • Sir Partha Dasgupta, Frank Ramsey Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Cambridge
    - Progress toward Sustainability
  • Shunsuke Managi, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Inclusive Wealth Report 2018
  • Barbara Fraumeni, Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
    - Human capital: educational attainment progress
  • Pushpam Kumar, Senior Economic Advisor, United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)
    - Inclusive Metrics for Sustainable Development Goals

Moderator: Shunsuke Managi, Kyushu University

27-SEP / DAY 3 / PROGRAM

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY3

Regional Leadership and Security in a Neo-Nationalist Era: A focus on Southeast Asia

Kyushu University

Abstract:

Nationalism in Asia is regaining momentum. Governments in the region are being pressured by public discontent, economic globalization and regional integration, resulting into reduced commitment to the international liberal order. Growing tensions between neighboring countries are also threatening to lead to military conflicts. What are the prospects for a regional convergence of interests that could provide the basis for a positive sum game between Asian nations? Are the conditions conducive to greater regional economic, social and political security there? Can specific ASEAN nations play a leadership role in fostering greater interdependency and security? A deeper understanding of regional factors and actors is crucial to devise successful strategies for enduring security. We would highlight the case on the leadership role and their perspectives onto convincing Myanmar back in the international order especially during the post Nargis disaster. It was a regional initiative which ASEAN’s collective concern and aid vis-a-vis the growing number of casualties claimed by the natural disaster triumphed Myanmar’s national security concerns. This was a historical achievement since this took place against an ironclad military junta, breaking the limits of UN and major power’s initiatives. From the dialogue on these security issues which overlaps the idea of national security and humanitarian intervention, the key leaders and academics, would discuss how regionalism, especially ASEAN, made a difference. The lessons from their inclusive leadership skills may emerge to foster sustainable growth in Asia and beyond.

Speakers:

  • Kasit Piromya, Former Foreign Minister of Thailand
  • Takashi Shiraishi, Chancellor, Prefectural University of Kumamoto and Professor Emeritus, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)
  • Hassan Wirajuda, Former Foreign Minister of Indonesia

Moderator: Nobuhiro Aizawa, Kyushu University

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Engaging key stakeholders in addressing biosecurity challenges: Insights from the social sciences

In partnership with the Inter Academy partnership (IAP)

Background:

Many scientific advances – from Alfred Nobel’s dynamite, to the discovery of nuclear fission and now artificial intelligence and robotics – can be used for good or for harm.
Recent advances in biotechnology, including synthetic biology and genome editing, also fall into this category of dual-use research, raising the spectre of issues relating to biosecurity.
In the context of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), which was ratified in 1975, biosecurity is – “most commonly used to refer to mechanisms to establish and maintain the security and oversight of pathogenic microorganisms, toxins and relevant resources”.
However, major epidemics of infectious diseases such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the West African Ebola epidemic of 2013-2016 have highlighted the fact that biosecurity issues may emerge ‘naturally’ rather than by deliberate malfeasance.
In addition, rapid strides are being made in molecular biology and other relevant fields. Recent advances in synthetic biology and genome editing, such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system, for example, allow the manipulation of organisms with new levels of precision and at much cheaper costs – making it possible for a reasonably-well trained scientist or laboratory technician to carry out biotech procedures far from the public eye (there is even a growing DIY synthetic biology initiative).
Indeed, the fact that genome editing has been identified as a potential weapon of mass destruction by the U.S. Intelligence Community in its ‘Worldwide Threat Assessment’ of February 2016 has increased attention to the security dimensions of the technology.

Session outline:

This session will introduce the recent advances in biotechnology – starting with ‘traditional’ genetic modification as used in many crop varieties worldwide, and then focus on synthetic biology (e.g. the creation of synthetic bacterial genomes), genome editing, and gene drive technologies.
The major focus of the session will review the biosecurity issues, in particular the legal and ethical implications related to these technologies, how the scientific community is playing a critical role in self-governance, as well as lessons to be learned for public engagement based on past experiences with controversies over GMOs and stem cell research.

Speakers:

  • Peter McGrath, InterAcademy Partnership, Italy
  • Robin Fears, European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC), Germany
  • Jo Husbands, US National Research Council (NRC), USA
  • Sue Meek, the Australian National University, Australia
  • Sasha Kagansky, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Sam Weiss Evans, Tufts University, USA

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Universal Security, Multiple pathways: Critical cross-cultural perspectives on Human Security

Chaired by: Thomas Reuter, International Union of Anthropological Science (IUAES)

Abstract:

The concept of human security emerges from people-centred efforts to understand vulnerability and resilience. It is utterly different from narrow tribalist concepts of national security. As a new paradigm, the concept is driven in part by the urgent need to address global threats that transcend the jurisdiction and capability of nation states and where use of exclusionary armed security strategies is often an obstacle rather than a solution. As an issue of moral responsibility for the whole global community, human security also understands the condition of ‘security’ holistically. Whilst ensuring freedom from direct physical threat and violence is important, human security crucially also means ensuring all people’s equitable access to vital resources. Consequently, any denial of such access to any human being is an act of structural violence.
This panel seeks to explore human security from the cross-cultural perspective of anthropology. Going beyond simplistic metrics of supply and demand, we ask: What is it that threatens or guarantees humans’ access to vital resources such as food, water and livelihoods in different societies? What distinguishes different political economies, how do socio-cultural resources and values shape outcomes, and what are the variable constraints and opportunities for development interventions across different societies?

Speakers:

  • Thomas Reuter, Senior Vice-president of IUAES / University of Melbourne, Australia
    - Food Sovereignty and food Solidarity: Foundations of Human Security at Local and Global Levels
  • Andrew Mugsy Spiegel, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    - Misreading expectations of security: Development’s perverse uses of notions of appropriateness
  • Zhang Jijiao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China
    - Unequal Development Opportunities for the Developing Countries in the Current World
  • Sabine Mannitz, Head of Research Department ‘Glocal Junctions’, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, Germany
    - What’s behind security in security sector reform?
  • Thomas Hylland Eriksen, University of Oslo, Norway
    - Small scale in an overheated world: Security and insecurity in the Seychelles

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Overcoming Contemporary Global Crises based on the Relational Studies: a new approach to restore a society with equality and security

Chaired by: Keiko Sakai, Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University

Abstract:

Since the turn of the century, we have witnessed critical events and disasters such as 9.11, War on Afghanistan, War on Iraq, brutal aftermath of Arab Uprisings, Civil Wars in Syria and Yemen, as well as emergence of Islamic State. Wars and conflicts caused tremendous flow of refugees and migrants from Middle East to the Europe, which resulted in, in a way, the Brexit and birth of Trump administration. Socio-economic trans-border networks with SNS, modern technology, and global human mobilization, are now the part of our daily life, as subtheme 5 of the Conference < Globalization, diversity, and cultures of belonging > clearly points out.
As the above subtheme focuses “the rapid increase in mobility of human beings, money, commodities and information on society, economy and politics”, even a smallest event we experience can be a trigger to calamitous results that shook the whole world. 5 years-Syrian boy who was drowned in the Mediterranean Sea moved the global public opinion, caused serious discussions on multi-culturalism in the EU, giving a rise of populism, as well as of religious extremism.
How, then, can we grasp such complicated and intertwined web of relationships, from local level to global level? How can we analyse them, solve them and stop crises to occur again? This question is the starting point of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”. Can’t we establish an innovative area of academism to gather all the human wisdom and knowledge in order to solve these vital and crucial problems that our dear planet faces? This is the purpose of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”, which pursues freedom, democracy, and security from diverse aspects, as subtheme 9 deals with.
In this session, session organizer proposes a new perspective named “Relational Studies on Global Crises” to understand the current global crises which we believe will contribute to the WSSF’s challenge “to create a platform for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research to contribute to transformations to the sustainable world”. Session organizer invites three prominent scholars who study various conflicting areas based on various academic methodologies, but who share the necessity of introducing the new way forward to effective social and political change. These panelists are:

Wendy Bracewell, Professor of South-East European History, from UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES). Title of her presentation is “Eastern Europe without Borders”.
Filip Reyntjens, Emeritus Professor of Law and Politics, from Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), University of Antwerp. Title of his presentation is "A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict: The case of the African great lakes region".
Zahra Ali, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences. Title of her presentation is "Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq".
Adding to the above three, the session organizer, Keiko SAKAI, a professor and dean of the Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University gives her presentation on “Analysing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises”

Speakers:

  • Keiko Sakai, Faculty of Law, Dean of Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University, Japan
    - Analyzing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises
  • Wendy Bracewell, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), UK
    - Eastern Europe without Borders
  • Filip Reyntjens, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), Belgium
    - A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict:The case of the African great lakes region
  • Zahra Ali, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences, USA
    - Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Cross Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Education and Job Security among the Young

Chaired by: Emiko Usui, Japanese Economic Association (JEA)

Abstract:

Gender differences in college majors persists, which lead to gender differences in careers and job security. Many possible explanations have been offered for these gaps: such as gender differences in career preferences, individual abilities of separate academic fields, risk aversion, culture, gender stereotypes, and role models. This session—invited session of the Japanese Economic Association—aims to address these issues focusing on two countries: Japan and the United States.
We conducted a survey on undergraduate students at Kyushu University, Japan from December 1, 2016 to early January 2017, while being helped by the Kyushu University administration, to understand the gender differences in their perspectives for future career, job security, and family life. We will present two papers based on this survey. One paper demonstrates distinct gender differences in expectations of future career, job security, and family life. The results are striking that already wide gender gaps in preferences and career perspectives are present among the undergraduate students surveyed, though they entered college based on the same academic standard. The second paper evaluates how government policies can alter the students’ expectations of future career and job security and family concerns. The first paper will be presented by Emiko Usui, an experienced empirical labor economist with expertise in socio-economic surveys in Japan. The second paper will be presented by Tsunao Okumura, an innovative econometrician, who has contributed to the partial identification literature related to subjective expectation analysis. As the World Social Science Forum will be held in Kyushu, we will directly provide the latest results from Kyushu University to the Kyushu audience, which will provide significant implications not only for Kyushu, but also for the future of young people in Japan.
asit Zafar is a world leading researcher in this academic subject, who has also contributed to the survey at Kyushu University and has conducted subjective expectation surveys at many universities outside Japan. Basit will present his ongoing project that examines how the gender differences in risk preferences impact job search behaviors by collecting data on graduates of Bachelor of Business from an elite university in the US.
Donna Ginther will present her paper on gender differences in college majors in the US. Donna, an established scholar, is well-known for her research on gender differences in academic careers. In her paper, she will examine how gender stereotypes, culture, role models, competition, risk aversion, and interests contribute to gender STEM gap, starting at childhood, solidifying by middle school, and affecting women and men as they progress through school, higher education, and into the labor market.
In addition to her established academic career, she has contributed to various public activities. She was formerly on the board of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP) of the American Economic Association, and has overseen mentoring for junior economists at the CSWEP. These mentoring workshops have demonstrated that their programs had positive and significant impacts on the careers of the participants. She has testified before the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education of the US House of Representatives on Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. She has also advised the National Academies of Science, National Institutes of Health, and Sloan Foundation on the diversity and future of the scientific workforce. Her participation will be an excellent opportunity to learn how to provide mentoring workshops for junior researchers.

Speakers:

  • Emiko Usui, Institute for Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Education and Job Security of College Students in Japan
  • Tsunao Okumura, Graduate School of International Social Sciences, Yokohama National University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Career Choice of College Students in Japan
  • Basit Zafar, Department of Economics, Arizona State University, USA
    - Risk Preferences, Job Search, and the Gender Wage Gap
  • Donna Ginther, Center for Economic and Business Analysis at the Institute for Policy and Social Research, University of Kansas, USA
    - Women and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are Differences in Education and Careers Due to Stereotypes, Interests, or Family?

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Mobility, Diversity, and Human Networks: Asian Women’s Life Strategies

Chaired by: Noriko Ijichi, the Japan Sociological Society (JSS)

Abstract:

This research aims to collect fundamental data to clarify the potential of the micro-level lifeworld for generating cooperation in response to macro social change by describing and analyzing the processes of lifestyle creation, transformation, and recreation spawned by migration alongside changes in international society following the 20th century in East Asia. Taking migrant women as our subject, we hope to investigate not only generational background, migration histories, networks, and cultural transition and reorganization of the lifeworld in the host society, but specifically identify the logic produced in response to such changes by "non-mobile" members in sending societies responsible for maintaining and passing on culture. Kwon argues for the importance of reconsidering the place of women within migration research, delineating the viewpoint presented in this panel`s case studies, all of which focus on female migration within Asia. By investigating the migration of Korean women in Japan through family histories, Hong considers the meaning of an individual`s life situated within familial constraints. Sakurada`s paper compares cases of ethnic Chinese women in Malaysia who migrate for study and work opportunities with those who deliberately choose to remain at their birthplace, analyzing the social background that produces such decisions.
Kato and Ijichi examine the lifeworld of people who settled in Co To, an isolated island near the northeastern Vietnamese border. Focusing specifically on the motive for domestic migration, lifestyle following migration and relationships with the origin, this study discusses the manner in which the lifeworld develops when the path of migration is viewed from women`s perspective. Each of these studies examines the possibility of empirically and multifacetedly clarifying the dynamic change that occurs within an individual`s lifeworld alongside the major social transitions of 20th century Asia. Further, in contrast to prior literature concerning migrant populations in East Asia, we focus on specific practice in the lifeworld that cannot be entirely reduced to an individual`s response to politico-economic conditions, nor can it be converged with the nation-state; to our subjects, culture is not a return to tradition, nor is it a simple rejection of assimilation with the host society.

Speakers:

  • Heonik Kwon, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Rethinking Migration
  • Atsufumi Kato, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan & Noriko Ijichi, Osaka City University, Japan
    - Living on the edge: the lifeworld of settlers in a borderland island in Vietnam
  • Ryoko Sakurada, Ikuei Junior College, Japan
    - In Between the Choices and the Decisions: Dynamism of Rural-to-Urban Migration of Chinese Women in Malaysia
  • Hong, Jung-eun, Visiting Researcher Ritsumeikan Center for Korean Studies, Korea
    - Women's lives and dispersed Korean families in North Korea, South Korea, and Japan

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Engaging key stakeholders in addressing biosecurity challenges: Insights from the social sciences

In partnership with the Inter Academy partnership (IAP)

Background:

Many scientific advances – from Alfred Nobel’s dynamite, to the discovery of nuclear fission and now artificial intelligence and robotics – can be used for good or for harm.
Recent advances in biotechnology, including synthetic biology and genome editing, also fall into this category of dual-use research, raising the spectre of issues relating to biosecurity.
In the context of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), which was ratified in 1975, biosecurity is – “most commonly used to refer to mechanisms to establish and maintain the security and oversight of pathogenic microorganisms, toxins and relevant resources”.
However, major epidemics of infectious diseases such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the West African Ebola epidemic of 2013-2016 have highlighted the fact that biosecurity issues may emerge ‘naturally’ rather than by deliberate malfeasance.
In addition, rapid strides are being made in molecular biology and other relevant fields. Recent advances in synthetic biology and genome editing, such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system, for example, allow the manipulation of organisms with new levels of precision and at much cheaper costs – making it possible for a reasonably-well trained scientist or laboratory technician to carry out biotech procedures far from the public eye (there is even a growing DIY synthetic biology initiative).
Indeed, the fact that genome editing has been identified as a potential weapon of mass destruction by the U.S. Intelligence Community in its ‘Worldwide Threat Assessment’ of February 2016 has increased attention to the security dimensions of the technology.

Session outline:

This session will introduce the recent advances in biotechnology – starting with ‘traditional’ genetic modification as used in many crop varieties worldwide, and then focus on synthetic biology (e.g. the creation of synthetic bacterial genomes), genome editing, and gene drive technologies.
The major focus of the session will review the biosecurity issues, in particular the legal and ethical implications related to these technologies, how the scientific community is playing a critical role in self-governance, as well as lessons to be learned for public engagement based on past experiences with controversies over GMOs and stem cell research.

Speakers:

  • Peter McGrath, InterAcademy Partnership, Italy
  • Robin Fears, European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC), Germany
  • Jo Husbands, US National Research Council (NRC), USA
  • Sue Meek, the Australian National University, Australia
  • Sasha Kagansky, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Sam Weiss Evans, Tufts University, USA

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Universal Security, Multiple pathways: Critical cross-cultural perspectives on Human Security

Chaired by: Thomas Reuter, International Union of Anthropological Science (IUAES)

Abstract:

The concept of human security emerges from people-centred efforts to understand vulnerability and resilience. It is utterly different from narrow tribalist concepts of national security. As a new paradigm, the concept is driven in part by the urgent need to address global threats that transcend the jurisdiction and capability of nation states and where use of exclusionary armed security strategies is often an obstacle rather than a solution. As an issue of moral responsibility for the whole global community, human security also understands the condition of ‘security’ holistically. Whilst ensuring freedom from direct physical threat and violence is important, human security crucially also means ensuring all people’s equitable access to vital resources. Consequently, any denial of such access to any human being is an act of structural violence.
This panel seeks to explore human security from the cross-cultural perspective of anthropology. Going beyond simplistic metrics of supply and demand, we ask: What is it that threatens or guarantees humans’ access to vital resources such as food, water and livelihoods in different societies? What distinguishes different political economies, how do socio-cultural resources and values shape outcomes, and what are the variable constraints and opportunities for development interventions across different societies?

Speakers:

  • Thomas Reuter, Senior Vice-president of IUAES / University of Melbourne, Australia
    - Food Sovereignty and food Solidarity: Foundations of Human Security at Local and Global Levels
  • Andrew Mugsy Spiegel, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    - Misreading expectations of security: Development’s perverse uses of notions of appropriateness
  • Zhang Jijiao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China
    - Unequal Development Opportunities for the Developing Countries in the Current World
  • Sabine Mannitz, Head of Research Department ‘Glocal Junctions’, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, Germany
    - What’s behind security in security sector reform?
  • Thomas Hylland Eriksen, University of Oslo, Norway
    - Small scale in an overheated world: Security and insecurity in the Seychelles

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Overcoming Contemporary Global Crises based on the Relational Studies: a new approach to restore a society with equality and security

Chaired by: Keiko Sakai, Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University

Abstract:

Since the turn of the century, we have witnessed critical events and disasters such as 9.11, War on Afghanistan, War on Iraq, brutal aftermath of Arab Uprisings, Civil Wars in Syria and Yemen, as well as emergence of Islamic State. Wars and conflicts caused tremendous flow of refugees and migrants from Middle East to the Europe, which resulted in, in a way, the Brexit and birth of Trump administration. Socio-economic trans-border networks with SNS, modern technology, and global human mobilization, are now the part of our daily life, as subtheme 5 of the Conference < Globalization, diversity, and cultures of belonging > clearly points out.
As the above subtheme focuses “the rapid increase in mobility of human beings, money, commodities and information on society, economy and politics”, even a smallest event we experience can be a trigger to calamitous results that shook the whole world. 5 years-Syrian boy who was drowned in the Mediterranean Sea moved the global public opinion, caused serious discussions on multi-culturalism in the EU, giving a rise of populism, as well as of religious extremism.
How, then, can we grasp such complicated and intertwined web of relationships, from local level to global level? How can we analyse them, solve them and stop crises to occur again? This question is the starting point of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”. Can’t we establish an innovative area of academism to gather all the human wisdom and knowledge in order to solve these vital and crucial problems that our dear planet faces? This is the purpose of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”, which pursues freedom, democracy, and security from diverse aspects, as subtheme 9 deals with.
In this session, session organizer proposes a new perspective named “Relational Studies on Global Crises” to understand the current global crises which we believe will contribute to the WSSF’s challenge “to create a platform for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research to contribute to transformations to the sustainable world”. Session organizer invites three prominent scholars who study various conflicting areas based on various academic methodologies, but who share the necessity of introducing the new way forward to effective social and political change. These panelists are:

Wendy Bracewell, Professor of South-East European History, from UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES). Title of her presentation is “Eastern Europe without Borders”.
Filip Reyntjens, Emeritus Professor of Law and Politics, from Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), University of Antwerp. Title of his presentation is "A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict: The case of the African great lakes region".
Zahra Ali, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences. Title of her presentation is "Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq".
Adding to the above three, the session organizer, Keiko SAKAI, a professor and dean of the Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University gives her presentation on “Analysing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises”

Speakers:

  • Keiko Sakai, Faculty of Law, Dean of Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University, Japan
    - Analyzing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises
  • Wendy Bracewell, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), UK
    - Eastern Europe without Borders
  • Filip Reyntjens, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), Belgium
    - A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict:The case of the African great lakes region
  • Zahra Ali, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences, USA
    - Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Cross Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Education and Job Security among the Young

Chaired by: Emiko Usui, Japanese Economic Association (JEA)

Abstract:

Gender differences in college majors persists, which lead to gender differences in careers and job security. Many possible explanations have been offered for these gaps: such as gender differences in career preferences, individual abilities of separate academic fields, risk aversion, culture, gender stereotypes, and role models. This session—invited session of the Japanese Economic Association—aims to address these issues focusing on two countries: Japan and the United States.
We conducted a survey on undergraduate students at Kyushu University, Japan from December 1, 2016 to early January 2017, while being helped by the Kyushu University administration, to understand the gender differences in their perspectives for future career, job security, and family life. We will present two papers based on this survey. One paper demonstrates distinct gender differences in expectations of future career, job security, and family life. The results are striking that already wide gender gaps in preferences and career perspectives are present among the undergraduate students surveyed, though they entered college based on the same academic standard. The second paper evaluates how government policies can alter the students’ expectations of future career and job security and family concerns. The first paper will be presented by Emiko Usui, an experienced empirical labor economist with expertise in socio-economic surveys in Japan. The second paper will be presented by Tsunao Okumura, an innovative econometrician, who has contributed to the partial identification literature related to subjective expectation analysis. As the World Social Science Forum will be held in Kyushu, we will directly provide the latest results from Kyushu University to the Kyushu audience, which will provide significant implications not only for Kyushu, but also for the future of young people in Japan.
asit Zafar is a world leading researcher in this academic subject, who has also contributed to the survey at Kyushu University and has conducted subjective expectation surveys at many universities outside Japan. Basit will present his ongoing project that examines how the gender differences in risk preferences impact job search behaviors by collecting data on graduates of Bachelor of Business from an elite university in the US.
Donna Ginther will present her paper on gender differences in college majors in the US. Donna, an established scholar, is well-known for her research on gender differences in academic careers. In her paper, she will examine how gender stereotypes, culture, role models, competition, risk aversion, and interests contribute to gender STEM gap, starting at childhood, solidifying by middle school, and affecting women and men as they progress through school, higher education, and into the labor market.
In addition to her established academic career, she has contributed to various public activities. She was formerly on the board of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP) of the American Economic Association, and has overseen mentoring for junior economists at the CSWEP. These mentoring workshops have demonstrated that their programs had positive and significant impacts on the careers of the participants. She has testified before the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education of the US House of Representatives on Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. She has also advised the National Academies of Science, National Institutes of Health, and Sloan Foundation on the diversity and future of the scientific workforce. Her participation will be an excellent opportunity to learn how to provide mentoring workshops for junior researchers.

Speakers:

  • Emiko Usui, Institute for Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Education and Job Security of College Students in Japan
  • Tsunao Okumura, Graduate School of International Social Sciences, Yokohama National University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Career Choice of College Students in Japan
  • Basit Zafar, Department of Economics, Arizona State University, USA
    - Risk Preferences, Job Search, and the Gender Wage Gap
  • Donna Ginther, Center for Economic and Business Analysis at the Institute for Policy and Social Research, University of Kansas, USA
    - Women and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are Differences in Education and Careers Due to Stereotypes, Interests, or Family?

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Mobility, Diversity, and Human Networks: Asian Women’s Life Strategies

Chaired by: Noriko Ijichi, the Japan Sociological Society (JSS)

Abstract:

This research aims to collect fundamental data to clarify the potential of the micro-level lifeworld for generating cooperation in response to macro social change by describing and analyzing the processes of lifestyle creation, transformation, and recreation spawned by migration alongside changes in international society following the 20th century in East Asia. Taking migrant women as our subject, we hope to investigate not only generational background, migration histories, networks, and cultural transition and reorganization of the lifeworld in the host society, but specifically identify the logic produced in response to such changes by "non-mobile" members in sending societies responsible for maintaining and passing on culture. Kwon argues for the importance of reconsidering the place of women within migration research, delineating the viewpoint presented in this panel`s case studies, all of which focus on female migration within Asia. By investigating the migration of Korean women in Japan through family histories, Hong considers the meaning of an individual`s life situated within familial constraints. Sakurada`s paper compares cases of ethnic Chinese women in Malaysia who migrate for study and work opportunities with those who deliberately choose to remain at their birthplace, analyzing the social background that produces such decisions.
Kato and Ijichi examine the lifeworld of people who settled in Co To, an isolated island near the northeastern Vietnamese border. Focusing specifically on the motive for domestic migration, lifestyle following migration and relationships with the origin, this study discusses the manner in which the lifeworld develops when the path of migration is viewed from women`s perspective. Each of these studies examines the possibility of empirically and multifacetedly clarifying the dynamic change that occurs within an individual`s lifeworld alongside the major social transitions of 20th century Asia. Further, in contrast to prior literature concerning migrant populations in East Asia, we focus on specific practice in the lifeworld that cannot be entirely reduced to an individual`s response to politico-economic conditions, nor can it be converged with the nation-state; to our subjects, culture is not a return to tradition, nor is it a simple rejection of assimilation with the host society.

Speakers:

  • Heonik Kwon, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Rethinking Migration
  • Atsufumi Kato, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan & Noriko Ijichi, Osaka City University, Japan
    - Living on the edge: the lifeworld of settlers in a borderland island in Vietnam
  • Ryoko Sakurada, Ikuei Junior College, Japan
    - In Between the Choices and the Decisions: Dynamism of Rural-to-Urban Migration of Chinese Women in Malaysia
  • Hong, Jung-eun, Visiting Researcher Ritsumeikan Center for Korean Studies, Korea
    - Women's lives and dispersed Korean families in North Korea, South Korea, and Japan

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-04

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-04 Aspects of Security Concept needed to Manage the Historic Transition for a Sustainable World

Chairs:

  • Masayuki Horio, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan
  • Andrew C. Stirling, University of Sussex, UK

Speakers:

  • Masayuki Horio, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan
    - Session Introduction: Aspects of Security Concept Needed to Manage the Historic Transition for a Sustainable World
  • Andrew C. Stirling, University of Sussex, UK
    - Sustainability, Security and Transformation
  • Sawako Shigeto, The Graduate School of Project Design, Japan
    - Community empowered Urban/Rural Area Management for Secure Sustainable Transition
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Climate Change, Security and Spatial Management–A Sustainability Transition Perspective from Nature Friendly River Managements
  • Jinghai Li, National Natural Science Foundation of China, China
    - Mesoscience:Bridging natural and Social Sciences
  • Noboru Yasuda, Noh performing artist, Japan
    - Human 2.0 and the Sustainability Transition

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-05

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-05 Demographic contraction and post-consumerism in contemporary Japan: challenges, realities, and benefits

Chair:

  • Hein Mallee, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan

Speakers:

  • Maurie J. Cohen, New Jersey Institute of Technology, US
    -Demographic Contraction and Sustainable Consumption in High-Consuming Countries: Implications for Japan
  • Masahiro Umezaki, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Demographic decline and social innovation
  • Susanne Klien, Hokkaido University, Japan
    -Creative depopulation, alternative lifestyles and precarity in post-growth Japan

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-12

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-12 Disaster, risk management, local governance and sustainability: lessons from Future Earth studies

Chair:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Disaster, risk management, local governance and sustainability – An Introduction from the view-point of Future Earth-oriented transdisciplinary studies
  • Megumi Sugimoto, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Disaster lessons learned from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and the 2017 massive downpours in North Kyushu for future earth after the 2011 Tohoku tsunami
  • Yukyong, Jeong, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Building sustainable local economic community by various players; In the context of case studies of local communities in South Korea and Japan
  • Young-Geun, Kim, Korea University, the Republic of Korea
    - Sustainability of Korean Life-Security Regime and Governance After 4.16 Sewol-Ho Disaster
  • James D. Goltz, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Trans-disciplinary environments for emergency management: the case of California’s earthquake, tsunami and volcanic hazards program

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-16

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-16 UNESCO Session: What's Next for Sustainability Science?

Chair:

  • Irakli Khodeli, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia

Speakers:

  • Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, University of Yamanashi, Japan
    - Transdisciplinary approach for building societal resilience
  • Joan Sheelah O. Nalliw, the Municipal Council of Mayoyao, the Philippines
    - Indigenous people's perspective in Agenda 2030 delivery
  • Ai Sugiura, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia
    - Delivering SDGs in UNESCO designated sites based on Sustainability Science Approach
  • Irakli Khodeli, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia
    - Convergence of bioethics and sustainability science: addressing transboundary haze pollution in Southeast Asia

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-04

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-04 Aspects of Security Concept needed to Manage the Historic Transition for a Sustainable World

Chairs:

  • Masayuki Horio, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan
  • Andrew C. Stirling, University of Sussex, UK

Speakers:

  • Masayuki Horio, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan
    - Session Introduction: Aspects of Security Concept Needed to Manage the Historic Transition for a Sustainable World
  • Andrew C. Stirling, University of Sussex, UK
    - Sustainability, Security and Transformation
  • Sawako Shigeto, The Graduate School of Project Design, Japan
    - Community empowered Urban/Rural Area Management for Secure Sustainable Transition
  • Yukihiro Shimatani, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Climate Change, Security and Spatial Management–A Sustainability Transition Perspective from Nature Friendly River Managements
  • Jinghai Li, National Natural Science Foundation of China, China
    - Mesoscience:Bridging natural and Social Sciences
  • Noboru Yasuda, Noh performing artist, Japan
    - Human 2.0 and the Sustainability Transition

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-05

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-05 Demographic contraction and post-consumerism in contemporary Japan: challenges, realities, and benefits

Chair:

  • Hein Mallee, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan

Speakers:

  • Maurie J. Cohen, New Jersey Institute of Technology, US
    -Demographic Contraction and Sustainable Consumption in High-Consuming Countries: Implications for Japan
  • Masahiro Umezaki, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Demographic decline and social innovation
  • Susanne Klien, Hokkaido University, Japan
    -Creative depopulation, alternative lifestyles and precarity in post-growth Japan

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-12

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-12 Disaster, risk management, local governance and sustainability: lessons from Future Earth studies

Chair:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Disaster, risk management, local governance and sustainability – An Introduction from the view-point of Future Earth-oriented transdisciplinary studies
  • Megumi Sugimoto, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Disaster lessons learned from the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and the 2017 massive downpours in North Kyushu for future earth after the 2011 Tohoku tsunami
  • Yukyong, Jeong, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Building sustainable local economic community by various players; In the context of case studies of local communities in South Korea and Japan
  • Young-Geun, Kim, Korea University, the Republic of Korea
    - Sustainability of Korean Life-Security Regime and Governance After 4.16 Sewol-Ho Disaster
  • James D. Goltz, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Trans-disciplinary environments for emergency management: the case of California’s earthquake, tsunami and volcanic hazards program

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-16

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-16 UNESCO Session: What's Next for Sustainability Science?

Chair:

  • Irakli Khodeli, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia

Speakers:

  • Kuniyoshi Takeuchi, University of Yamanashi, Japan
    - Transdisciplinary approach for building societal resilience
  • Joan Sheelah O. Nalliw, the Municipal Council of Mayoyao, the Philippines
    - Indigenous people's perspective in Agenda 2030 delivery
  • Ai Sugiura, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia
    - Delivering SDGs in UNESCO designated sites based on Sustainability Science Approach
  • Irakli Khodeli, UNESCO Jakarta, Indonesia
    - Convergence of bioethics and sustainability science: addressing transboundary haze pollution in Southeast Asia

Parallel DAY 3: OP1-02

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP1-02 Development Studies and Knowledge Production – Which Way? In search of a transdisciplinary and transformative (research) agenda on equality

Chairs:

  • Susanne von Itter, European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI)
  • Julia Schoeneberg, European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI)

Speakers:

  • Sonja Ganseforth, German Institute for Japanese Studies (DIJ)
    - Knowledge and Power in Palestinian Development Politics
  • Oluwole Coker, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
    - Towards a Global Episteme: Translation as in Indigenous Yoruba Orature
  • Irene Blackberry, La Trobe University, Australia
    - SMArt: lessons from a rural health services research partnership in Australia
  • Pierre Bertrand, *Francesco Obino and *Gilles Dubochet, Global Development Network, India
    - Fostering research and practice co-creation for development. The experience of setting up PANCAnet: a research and practice network on natural capital accounting in the Pacific

≪*presenting author≫

Parallel DAY 3: CS3-01

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS3-01 Human Security in East Asia: Ownership and Future Collaboration

Chair:

  • Ako Muto, Japan International Cooperation Agency Research Institute (JICA-RI), Japan

PART1: The State of the Art of Human Security in East Asia

Moderator:

  • Ako Muto, JICA-RI, Japan

Speakers:

  • Nobuko Kayashima, JICA-RI, Japan
    - Introduction to The Research Project: Beyond the State Capacity
  • Ren Xiao ,Fudan University,China
    - Human Security: The Chinese Perspective
  • Kim Eun Mee ,Ewha Womans University,South Korea
    - Human Security in Practice in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Era: The Case of South Korea
  • Yoichi Mine,Doshisha University and JICA RI, Japan
    - Human Security and Japan: Beyond a Donor Perspective

Discussant:

  • Carolina Hernandez, Institute for Strategic and Development Studies (ISDS), and University of the Philippines

PART2: Toward Dynamic Operationalization of Human Security in East Asia

Moderator:

  • Yoichi Mine, Doshisha University, Japan

Speaker:

  • Ako Muto, JICA-RI, Japan
    - Dynamic operationalization of HS in East Asia

coming soon

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS5-03

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS5-03 International Crisis in Asia Pacific

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo

Chair:

  • Naofumi Nakamura, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Moderator:

  • Hiroyuki Hoshiro, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Keynote:

  • Annelise Riles, Cornell University, USA
    - Crisis thinking and Collaboration

Speakers:

  • Tomoo Marukawa ,Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Is China the Troublemaker?—Rare earth and Fishery crises in Japan
  • Yasunobu Okabe, Tohoku University, Japan
    - Two financial crises in East Asia: Origins, resilience, and vulnerability
  • Yanghyeon Jo, Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security, South Korea
    - Crisis and Korea-Japan Relations: International Crisis as a Facilitator of Korea-Japan Cooperation
  • Hiroyuki Hoshiro, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    - How to prevent military interstate disputes (MIDs)?

Discussant:

  • David Leheny, Waseda University, Japan

Parallel DAY 3: OP1-02

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP1-02 Development Studies and Knowledge Production – Which Way? In search of a transdisciplinary and transformative (research) agenda on equality

Chairs:

  • Susanne von Itter, European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI)
  • Julia Schoeneberg, European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI)

Speakers:

  • Sonja Ganseforth, German Institute for Japanese Studies (DIJ)
    - Knowledge and Power in Palestinian Development Politics
  • Oluwole Coker, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
    - Towards a Global Episteme: Translation as in Indigenous Yoruba Orature
  • Irene Blackberry, La Trobe University, Australia
    - SMArt: lessons from a rural health services research partnership in Australia
  • Pierre Bertrand, *Francesco Obino and *Gilles Dubochet, Global Development Network, India
    - Fostering research and practice co-creation for development. The experience of setting up PANCAnet: a research and practice network on natural capital accounting in the Pacific
  • 《*presenting authors》

Parallel DAY 3: CS3-01

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS3-01 Human Security in East Asia: Ownership and Future Collaboration

Chair:

  • Ako Muto, Japan International Cooperation Agency Research Institute (JICA-RI), Japan

PART1: The State of the Art of Human Security in East Asia

Moderator:

  • Ako Muto, JICA-RI, Japan

Speakers:

  • Nobuko Kayashima, JICA-RI, Japan
    - Introduction to The Research Project: Beyond the State Capacity
  • Ren Xiao ,Fudan University,China
    - Human Security: The Chinese Perspective
  • Kim Eun Mee ,Ewha Womans University,South Korea
    - Human Security in Practice in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Era: The Case of South Korea
  • Yoichi Mine,Doshisha University and JICA RI, Japan
    - Human Security and Japan: Beyond a Donor Perspective

Discussant:

  • Carolina Hernandez, Institute for Strategic and Development Studies (ISDS), and University of the Philippines

PART2: Toward Dynamic Operationalization of Human Security in East Asia

Moderator:

  • Yoichi Mine, Doshisha University, Japan

Speaker:

  • Ako Muto, JICA-RI, Japan
    - Dynamic operationalization of HS in East Asia

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS5-03

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS5-03 International Crisis in Asia Pacific

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner- Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo

Chair:

  • Naofumi Nakamura, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Moderator:

  • Hiroyuki Hoshiro, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Keynote:

  • Annelise Riles, Cornell University, USA
    - Crisis thinking and Collaboration

Speakers:

  • Tomoo Marukawa ,Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    -Is China the Troublemaker?—Rare earth and Fishery crises in Japan
  • Yasunobu Okabe, Tohoku University, Japan
    - Two financial crises in East Asia: Origins, resilience, and vulnerability
  • Yanghyeon Jo, Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security, South Korea
    - Crisis and Korea-Japan Relations: International Crisis as a Facilitator of Korea-Japan Cooperation
  • Hiroyuki Hoshiro, Institute of Social Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    - How to prevent military interstate disputes (MIDs)?

Discussant:

  • David Leheny, Waseda University, Japan

Parallel DAY 3: CS5-07

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS5-07 Globalization and Security in Asia-Pacific: contributions from geography

Chair:

  • Akihiko Takagi, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Rupakjyoti Borah, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Exploring cultural and geopolitical contiguity between India and the ASEAN region
  • Yungang Liu, Sun-Yat Sen University, China
    - The state of art of Chinese political geography
  • Guanwen Yin, Shandong Normal University, China
    - The Space Production and Sustainability of the "Ghost Town": A case study of Ordos city
  • Yukio Teratoko, University of Nagasaki, Japan
    - Possibilities of new social relationships in Japan’s rural areas: From the viewpoint of social capital
  • Akihiko Takagi, Kyushu University, Japan
    - New dynamics of border regions in Japan

Parallel DAY 3: OP6-01

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP6-01 The Politics of Inclusion: Towards a Secure and Sustainable Future

Chairs:

  • Alberto D Cimadamore, CROP - Comparative Research Program on Poverty, ISC, Norway
  • John Crowley, UNESCO

Speakers:

  • Gilbert Siame, The University of Zambia, and Centre for Urban Research and Planning (CURP)
    - Understanding social inclusion from the perspectives of slum dwellers in Kampala (Uganda)
  • Enrique Delamonica, Data & Analytics Section, UNICEF
    - Evaluating Progress towards the SDGs on socio-economic inclusion
  • Toru Oga, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Mapping Multicultural Discourses and Policy Practices: A Quantitative Text Analysis of Multicultural Coexistence Promotion Plans in Japanese Local Governments
  • Mirza Zulfiqur Rahman, Indian Institute of Technology, India
    - Infrastructure Development in Northeast India: Examining Inequality and Exclusion in the Development Promise of Progress and Prosperity
  • Gabriele Köhler, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development(UNRISD)
    - The politics of social inclusion: Observations and reflections

Discussant:

  • Pedro Manuel Monreal Gonzalez, UNESCO
  • Fadia Kiwan, St Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon

Parallel DAY 3: OP7-02

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP7-02 Security Through Work-Life Balance—Historical and Demographic Perspectives

Chairs:

  • Linda Grove, Social Science Research Council, USA
  • Reiko Aoki, Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan

Moderator:

  • Linda Grove, Social Science Research Council, USA

Speakers:

  • Machiko Osawa, Japan Women’s University, Japan
    - Japan’s Quiet Revolution
  • Rui Li, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Women’s Role Changes in Contemporary China
  • Guanlei Zheng, Tsinghua University, China
    - Younger Generations’ Fertility Desires and their Work-life Balance: Taking Chinese Yao women as an example
  • Honglian Piao, Ningbo University, China
    - A comparison of work-life balance between Chinese and Japanese women in child-rearing period -Taking highly educated Chinese women living in Shanghai and Tokyo as examples
  • Setsuya Fukuda, National Institute of Population and Social Policy, Japan
    - How to Achieve gender equity in Japan? Trends and Latest Policy Initiatives

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS5-07

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS5-07 Globalization and Security in Asia-Pacific: contributions from geography

Chair:

  • Akihiko Takagi, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Rupakjyoti Borah, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    - Exploring cultural and geopolitical contiguity between India and the ASEAN region
  • Yungang Liu, Sun-Yat Sen University, China
    - The state of art of Chinese political geography
  • Guanwen Yin, Shandong Normal University, China
    - The Space Production and Sustainability of the "Ghost Town": A case study of Ordos city
  • Yukio Teratoko, University of Nagasaki, Japan
    - Possibilities of new social relationships in Japan’s rural areas: From the viewpoint of social capital
  • Akihiko Takagi, Kyushu University, Japan
    - New dynamics of border regions in Japan

Parallel DAY 3: OP6-01

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP6-01 The Politics of Inclusion: Towards a Secure and Sustainable Future

Chairs:

  • Alberto D Cimadamore, CROP - Comparative Research Program on Poverty, ISC, Norway
  • John Crowley, UNESCO

Speakers:

  • Gilbert Siame, The University of Zambia, and Centre for Urban Research and Planning (CURP)
    - Understanding social inclusion from the perspectives of slum dwellers in Kampala (Uganda)
  • Enrique Delamonica, Data & Analytics Section, UNICEF
    - Evaluating Progress towards the SDGs on socio-economic inclusion
  • Toru Oga, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Mapping Multicultural Discourses and Policy Practices: A Quantitative Text Analysis of Multicultural Coexistence Promotion Plans in Japanese Local Governments
  • Mirza Zulfiqur Rahman, Indian Institute of Technology, India
    - Infrastructure Development in Northeast India: Examining Inequality and Exclusion in the Development Promise of Progress and Prosperity
  • Gabriele Köhler, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development(UNRISD)
    - The politics of social inclusion: Observations and reflections

Discussant:

  • Pedro Manuel Monreal Gonzalez, UNESCO
  • Fadia Kiwan, St Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon

Parallel DAY 3: OP7-02

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP7-02 Security Through Work-Life Balance—Historical and Demographic Perspectives

Chairs:

  • Linda Grove, Social Science Research Council, USA
  • Reiko Aoki, Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan

Moderator:

  • Linda Grove, Social Science Research Council, USA

Speakers:

  • Machiko Osawa, Japan Women’s University, Japan
    - Japan’s Quiet Revolution
  • Rui Li, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Women’s Role Changes in Contemporary China
  • Guanlei Zheng, Tsinghua University, China
    - Younger Generations’ Fertility Desires and their Work-life Balance: Taking Chinese Yao women as an example
  • Honglian Piao, Ningbo University, China
    - A comparison of work-life balance between Chinese and Japanese women in child-rearing period -Taking highly educated Chinese women living in Shanghai and Tokyo as examples
  • Setsuya Fukuda, National Institute of Population and Social Policy, Japan
    - How to Achieve gender equity in Japan? Trends and Latest Policy Initiatives

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: OP9-03

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP9-03 Democracy and its challengers

Chair:

  • Elisa Reis, the International Science Council (ISC) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Speakers:

  • Damir Kapidzic, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
    - Democratic attitudes and political participation among youth in the Southeast Europe: Assessing the impact of globalization and war
  • Suthikarn Meechan, Mahasarakham University, Thailand
    - Re-thinking Clientelism in Thai Politics: Can Local Powers Survive under Military Rule?
  • Chenwei Lin, Tokoha University , Japan
    - Cross-Strait Relations, Party Politics and Transformation of Sovereignty on Taiwan

Parallel DAY 3: OP9-03

14:00-16:00 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP9-03 Democracy and its challengers

Chair:

  • Elisa Reis, the International Science Council (ISC) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Speakers:

  • Damir Kapidzic, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
    - Democratic attitudes and political participation among youth in the Southeast Europe: Assessing the impact of globalization and war
  • Suthikarn Meechan, Mahasarakham University, Thailand
    - Re-thinking Clientelism in Thai Politics: Can Local Powers Survive under Military Rule?
  • Chenwei Lin, Tokoha University , Japan
    - Cross-Strait Relations, Party Politics and Transformation of Sovereignty on Taiwan

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-09

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-09 Co-creation of knowledge and co-planning towards sustainable and resilient futures

Chair:

  • Jennifer Freya Helgeson, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Freya Helgeson, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
    - Transformations of Social-Ecological Systems: Studies in co-creating integrated knowledge toward sustainable futures
  • Reiko Omoto*, Tottori University, Japan and Kevin Scribner, Salmon-Safe, USA
    - Salmon-Safe Certification in the Pacific Northwest of the United States
  • Tetsu Sato*, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, Shigeru Yanaka, Tottori University, Japan and Yoshimi Higa, Onna Village Fishery Cooperative, Japan
    - Knowledge and Technologies born from Livelihoods: A case study of Onna Village Fisheries Cooperative
  • Mitsutaku Makino*, National Research Institute of Fisheries Sciences, Japan and Hidetomo Tajima*, Tajima Labo Co., Ltd. , Japan
    - Co-creation, Co-evolution and Co-management of the Japanese coastal fisheries: a toolbox approach
  • Ilan Chabay, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany
    - Sources and Uses of Knowledge in Co-designing Sustainable Futures in the Arctic

≪*presenting author≫

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-14

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-14 Construction of Ecological Civilization

Chair:

  • Institute of Quantitative and Technical Economics(IQTE), Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS)

Coordinator:

  • The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) of South Africa

Speakers:

  • Ping LI and Youguo ZHANG, Institute of Quantitative and Technical Economics, CASS
    - Difficulties in China’s green development and ways to break through them
  • Fawen YU, Institute of Rural Development, CASS
    - Studies on implementation of the rural revitalization strategy in China
  • Shenning QU, Institute of Industrial Economics, CASS
    - China’s industrialization and the pathway of industrial carbon emissions
  • Xiang YU, Institute of Urban and Environmental Studies, CASS
    - Cities’ transition in China toward low- carbon, ecological and green
  • Jaya Josie, the BRICS Research Centre, HSRC
    - BRICS and the transition to a low carbon economy – the case of China, India and South Africa
  • Andreas Scheba, Economic Performance and Development unit of the HSRC
    - Poverty and inequality at the heart of research/Policy on 'ecological civilization' and the role of the social sciences

Parallel DAY 3: OP1-03

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP1-03 Research advances in Digital Earth to support human and environmental security

Chair:

  • Changlin Wang, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), China

Speakers:

  • Changlin Wang* and Mario Hernandez, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, CAS, China
    - The Sustainable Development Goals, a reason to develop a Digital Earth platform
  • Hiromichi Fukui, Chubu University, Japan
    - Statistical Geospatial Indicators on Human Security-related SDGs Implementation from Digital Earth Perspective
  • Akiyuki Kawasaki, University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) for data and model integration: cases in water-related disaster field
  • Hiroyuki Miyazaki, University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Development of An Introductory Course on GIS for Disaster Nursing
  • Santosh Nandi, Panskura Banamali College, India
    - Rural Development Modelling through Object Oriented Paradigm: An alternative to rural urban structural dualism

《* Presenting》

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-09

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-09 Co-creation of knowledge and co-planning towards sustainable and resilient futures

Chair:

  • Jennifer Freya Helgeson, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Freya Helgeson, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
    - Transformations of Social-Ecological Systems: Studies in co-creating integrated knowledge toward sustainable futures
  • Reiko Omoto*, Tottori University, Japan and Kevin Scribner, Salmon-Safe, USA
    - Salmon-Safe Certification in the Pacific Northwest of the United States
  • Tetsu Sato*, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, Shigeru Yanaka, Tottori University, Japan and Yoshimi Higa, Onna Village Fishery Cooperative, Japan
    - Knowledge and Technologies born from Livelihoods: A case study of Onna Village Fisheries Cooperative
  • Mitsutaku Makino*, National Research Institute of Fisheries Sciences, Japan and Hidetomo Tajima*, Tajima Labo Co., Ltd. , Japan
    - Co-creation, Co-evolution and Co-management of the Japanese coastal fisheries: a toolbox approach
  • Ilan Chabay, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany
    - Sources and Uses of Knowledge in Co-designing Sustainable Futures in the Arctic

≪*presenting author≫

Parallel DAY 3: CS1-14

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS1-14 Construction of Ecological Civilization

Chair:

  • Institute of Quantitative and Technical Economics(IQTE), Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS)

Coordinator:

  • The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) of South Africa

Speakers:

  • Ping LI and Youguo ZHANG, Institute of Quantitative and Technical Economics, CASS
    - Difficulties in China’s green development and ways to break through them
  • Fawen YU, Institute of Rural Development, CASS
    - Studies on implementation of the rural revitalization strategy in China
  • Shenning QU, Institute of Industrial Economics, CASS
    - China’s industrialization and the pathway of industrial carbon emissions
  • Xiang YU, Institute of Urban and Environmental Studies, CASS
    - Cities’ transition in China toward low- carbon, ecological and green
  • Jaya Josie, the BRICS Research Centre, HSRC
    - BRICS and the transition to a low carbon economy – the case of China, India and South Africa
  • Andreas Scheba, Economic Performance and Development unit of the HSRC
    - Poverty and inequality at the heart of research/Policy on 'ecological civilization' and the role of the social sciences

Parallel DAY 3: OP1-03

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP1-03 Research advances in Digital Earth to support human and environmental security

Chair:

  • Changlin Wang, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), China

Speakers:

  • Changlin Wang* and Mario Hernandez, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, CAS, China
    - The Sustainable Development Goals, a reason to develop a Digital Earth platform
  • Hiromichi Fukui, Chubu University, Japan
    - Statistical Geospatial Indicators on Human Security-related SDGs Implementation from Digital Earth Perspective
  • Akiyuki Kawasaki, University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) for data and model integration: cases in water-related disaster field
  • Hiroyuki Miyazaki, University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Development of An Introductory Course on GIS for Disaster Nursing
  • Santosh Nandi, Panskura Banamali College, India
    - Rural Development Modelling through Object Oriented Paradigm: An alternative to rural urban structural dualism

《* Presenting》

Parallel DAY 3: CS3-09

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS3-09 Towards a Beirut School of Critical Security Studies

Chair:

  • Arab Council for the Social Sciences(ACSS), Beirut, Lebanon

Moderator:

  • Omar S. Dahi, Hampshire College, USA

Speakers:

  • Omar S. Dahi, Hampshire College, USA
    - Who Is a Threat to Whom? Climate change and the politics of threat multipliers in the Syrian conflict
  • Nicole Grove, University of Hawaii-Manoa, USA
    - Criminality, Simulation, and the Performative Politics of Policing in Dubai
  • Waleed Hazbun,University of Alabama, USA
    - Writing Insecurity: Critical Security Studies and the International Relations of the Middle East
  • Karim Makdisi, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
    - The United Nations: The view from the Arab World
  • Jamil Mouawad, European University Institute, Italy
    - Lebanon’s border areas in light of the Syrian war: New actors, Old Marginalization

Parallel DAY 3: CS4-04

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS4-04 Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change

Chair:

  • Fabiola S. Sosa Rodriguez, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico

Moderator:

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico

Speakers:

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico
    - Impacts of climate change in water with a gender perspective and the SDG6
  • Shabana Khan, Indian Research Academy, India
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in New Delhi, India
  • Zheng Yan, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), China
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in Beijing, China
  • Fabiola S. Sosa-Rodrigue, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in Mexico City, Mexico

Parallel DAY 3: CS4-08

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS4-08 2020’s Science Decade of Global Understanding (SDGU)

Chair:

  • Benno Werlen, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany

Speakers:

  • Benno Werlen, Friedrich Schiller University Jena ,Germany
    -Global Understanding as a pre-condition for Sustainable Futures. The Aims and claims of the 2020’s Science Decade of Global Understanding (SDGU)
  • Carlos Alberto Torres, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), U.S.A.
    -Global Understanding to Global Citizenship Education: Civic Education for the Twenty First Century
  • Yukio Himiyama, International Geographical Union, Japan
    -How can the Global Understanding Initiative Promote Grass-root Activities for Sustainability?

Discussant:

  • Thomas Reuter, University of Melbourne, Australia and International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES)

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS3-09

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS3-09 Towards a Beirut School of Critical Security Studies

Chair:

  • Arab Council for the Social Sciences(ACSS), Beirut, Lebanon

Moderator:

  • Omar S. Dahi, Hampshire College, USA

Speakers:

  • Omar S. Dahi, Hampshire College, USA
    - Who Is a Threat to Whom? Climate change and the politics of threat multipliers in the Syrian conflict
  • Nicole Grove, University of Hawaii-Manoa, USA
    - Criminality, Simulation, and the Performative Politics of Policing in Dubai
  • Waleed Hazbun,University of Alabama, USA
    - Writing Insecurity: Critical Security Studies and the International Relations of the Middle East
  • Karim Makdisi, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
    - The United Nations: The view from the Arab World
  • Jamil Mouawad, European University Institute, Italy
    - Lebanon’s border areas in light of the Syrian war: New actors, Old Marginalization

Parallel DAY 3: CS4-04

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS4-04 Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change

Chair:

  • Fabiola S. Sosa Rodriguez, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico

Moderator:

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico

Speakers:

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico
    - Impacts of climate change in water with a gender perspective and the SDG6
  • Shabana Khan, Indian Research Academy, India
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in New Delhi, India
  • Zheng Yan, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), China
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in Beijing, China
  • Fabiola S. Sosa-Rodrigue, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico
    - Water challenges for the 2030 Agenda in the face of climate change in Mexico City, Mexico

Parallel DAY 3: CS4-08

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS4-08 2020’s Science Decade of Global Understanding (SDGU)

Chair:

  • Benno Werlen, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany

Speakers:

  • Benno Werlen, Friedrich Schiller University Jena ,Germany
    -Global Understanding as a pre-condition for Sustainable Futures. The Aims and claims of the 2020’s Science Decade of Global Understanding (SDGU)
  • Carlos Alberto Torres, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), U.S.A.
    -Global Understanding to Global Citizenship Education: Civic Education for the Twenty First Century
  • Yukio Himiyama, International Geographical Union, Japan
    -How can the Global Understanding Initiative Promote Grass-root Activities for Sustainability?

Discussant:

  • Thomas Reuter, University of Melbourne, Australia and International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES)

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: OP6-02

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP6-02 Sustainable and inclusive urban communities through urban agriculture

Chair:

  • Dona Pickard, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria

Speakers:

  • Manase Kudzai, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe
    - Class dimensions of urban agriculture in Harare, Zimbabwe
  • Bálint Balázs, Environmental Social Science Research Group, Hungary
    - Community building through food self provisioning in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Akane Bessho, Graduate Program in Sustainability Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Roles of urban agriculture for fostering social inclusion of immigrants: Case study of Black Creek Community Farm in Toronto, Canada
  • Dona Pickard, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
    - Actors, Networks and Processes of Urban Agriculture as a Manifestation of “The Right to the City”:Through the Example of Sofia Municipality, Bulgaria
  • Kai Kurimoto, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Can the Institutional System Revision of Urban Farmlands Promote Community Inclusiveness in Tokyo?

Parallel DAY 3: OP7-01

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP7-01- Gender Equity in Today’s Complex World: Identity, Context and Personal Security

Chairs:

  • Reiko Aoki, Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan
  • Kellina Craig-Henderson, US National Science Foundation, USA

Speakers:

  • Kellina Craig-Henderso, US National Science Foundation, USA
    - Enhancing Gender Equity by Understanding the Social Psychology Behind Bias and Harassment
  • Kazuo Yamaguch, University of Chicago and RIETI, Japan
    - The effects of firm’s work-life balance policies on gender wage gap and labor productivity in Japan
  • Emiko Usui, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Measures to empower working women in Japan
  • Mayumi Hohi, Chuo University, Japan
    - How does telework affect diversity?
  • Joshua K. Park, Sol Bridge International School of Business, Korea and Akira Kato, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The #MeToo Movement in East Asia: An Examination of its Manifestation, Reactions, and Criticisms

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS9-03

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS9-03 Security for a Sustainable Future: Perspectives from Positive Political Economy

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner-Waseda University

Chair:

  • Yasuyuki Todo, Waseda University, Japan

Keynote:

  • Aiji Tanaka, Wased University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Marisa Kellam ,Waseda University
    - The concCan Democracy Survive Without Free Media? A Cross-National Analysis of Media Freedom and Democratic Backsliding
  • Masaaki Higashijima, Tohoku University, Japan
    - The concThe Dictator’s Dilemma at the Ballot Box: Electoral Manipulation and Fiscal Maneuvering in Autocracies
  • Satoru Shimokawa, Waseda University, Japan
    - The concImpact of Dietary Changes and Food Security and Sustainability
  • Yasuyuki Todo, Waseda University, Japan
    - The concPropagation of Shocks due to Natural Disasters through Global Supply Chains

Parallel DAY 3: OP6-02

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP6-02 Sustainable and inclusive urban communities through urban agriculture

Chair:

  • Dona Pickard, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria

Speakers:

  • Manase Kudzai, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe
    - Class dimensions of urban agriculture in Harare, Zimbabwe
  • Bálint Balázs, Environmental Social Science Research Group, Hungary
    - Community building through food self provisioning in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Akane Bessho, Graduate Program in Sustainability Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Roles of urban agriculture for fostering social inclusion of immigrants: Case study of Black Creek Community Farm in Toronto, Canada
  • Dona Pickard, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
    - Actors, Networks and Processes of Urban Agriculture as a Manifestation of “The Right to the City”:Through the Example of Sofia Municipality, Bulgaria
  • Kai Kurimoto, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Can the Institutional System Revision of Urban Farmlands Promote Community Inclusiveness in Tokyo?

Parallel DAY 3: OP7-01

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP7-01- Gender Equity in Today’s Complex World: Identity, Context and Personal Security

Chairs:

  • Reiko Aoki, Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan
  • Kellina Craig-Henderson, US National Science Foundation, USA

Speakers:

  • Kellina Craig-Henderso, US National Science Foundation, USA
    - Enhancing Gender Equity by Understanding the Social Psychology Behind Bias and Harassment
  • Kazuo Yamaguch, University of Chicago and RIETI, Japan
    - The effects of firm’s work-life balance policies on gender wage gap and labor productivity in Japan
  • Emiko Usui, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Measures to empower working women in Japan
  • Mayumi Hohi, Chuo University, Japan
    - How does telework affect diversity?
  • Joshua K. Park, Sol Bridge International School of Business, Korea and Akira Kato, Kyushu University, Japan
    - The #MeToo Movement in East Asia: An Examination of its Manifestation, Reactions, and Criticisms

coming soon

Parallel DAY 3: CS9-03

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

CS9-03 Security for a Sustainable Future: Perspectives from Positive Political Economy

- chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner-Waseda University

Chair:

  • Yasuyuki Todo, Waseda University, Japan

Keynote:

  • Aiji Tanaka, Wased University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Marisa Kellam ,Waseda University
    - The concCan Democracy Survive Without Free Media? A Cross-National Analysis of Media Freedom and Democratic Backsliding
  • Masaaki Higashijima, Tohoku University, Japan
    - The concThe Dictator’s Dilemma at the Ballot Box: Electoral Manipulation and Fiscal Maneuvering in Autocracies
  • Satoru Shimokawa, Waseda University, Japan
    - The concImpact of Dietary Changes and Food Security and Sustainability
  • Yasuyuki Todo, Waseda University, Japan
    - The concPropagation of Shocks due to Natural Disasters through Global Supply Chains

Parallel DAY 3: OP9-04

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP9-04 Security in the Context of Fundamentalist Violence: Whither ‘the other good things in life’ in Africa

Chair:

  • Godwin Murunga, Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Senegal

Speakers:

  • Funmi Olonisakin, King’s College London, UK
    - The missing PEACE in responses to fundamentalist violence in Africa
  • Abdoulaye Bathily, United Nations, Senegal
    - Crisis in the Sahel: Governance, External Interventions, Trafficking and Terrorism: What Perspectives?
  • Cheryl Hendricks, the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa
    - Militarized Responses at the Expense of Human Security
  • Adebayo Olukoshi, International Idea, Ethiopia
    - The Governance Question: The Franchise in a Context of Extremist Violence

Parallel DAY 3: OP9-04

16:30-18:30 Thursday / 27-Sept

OP9-04 Security in the Context of Fundamentalist Violence: Whither ‘the other good things in life’ in Africa

Chair:

  • Godwin Murunga, Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Senegal

Speakers:

  • Funmi Olonisakin, King’s College London, UK
    - The missing PEACE in responses to fundamentalist violence in Africa
  • Abdoulaye Bathily, United Nations, Senegal
    - Crisis in the Sahel: Governance, External Interventions, Trafficking and Terrorism: What Perspectives?
  • Cheryl Hendricks, the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa
    - Militarized Responses at the Expense of Human Security
  • Adebayo Olukoshi, International Idea, Ethiopia
    - The Governance Question: The Franchise in a Context of Extremist Violence

28-SEP / DAY 4 / PROGRAM

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY4

New Forms of Conflict in a Global Age

ISC

Abstract:

The session will explore war in the modern world, including discussions on new types of conflicts, hybrid warfare, new weapons and arms trade. It will be the occasion of a unique discussion on new forms of conflict in a global age between a diverse group of leading lights. Hoda Abdel-Hamid, a prize-winning war correspondent with Al Jazeera, will act as moderator for this exciting panel which includes: General Roméo Dallaire, author of the best-seller book Shake Hands With the Devil and founder of the international Child Soldiers Initiative; the world-renowned expert on transnational terrorism and former Minister of Foreign Affairs from Mauritania Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou; the thought-leader on the global arms trade and corruption Andrew Feinstein; and the specialist on bio-weapons and misuse of scientific research Jo Husbands.

Speakers:

  • General Roméo Dallaire, renowned Canadian humanitarian, author and retired Senator and General
  • Andrew Feinstein, Executive Director of Corruption Watch, Investigative Writer, Broadcaster and Campaigner
  • Jo Husbands, Senior Project Director, U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
  • Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, Professor of International History, Graduate Institute, Geneva

Moderator: Hoda Abdel-Hamid, an award-winning correspondent for Al Jazeera English

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

From co-designing to co-delivery of risk reduction solutions

Rajib Shaw

Abstract:

A recent report on disaster science (Global Outlook of Disaster Science, 2017) by Elsevier has pointed out some crucial gaps and challenges in the disaster risk reduction research as follow: 1) the countries having highest casualty has lowest percentage of disaster research, and the countries with highest economic impacts have the maximum numbers of disaster research, 2) the countries with higher number of disaster research does not necessarily have the highest research impacts. This shows the importance of policy as well as community research. While the needs and importance of trans-, multi- and inter-disciplinary research have been discussed and highlighted in several forums, there still remains a core gap on identifying the research issues and providing need based solutions.
The proposed session will focus on the whole spectrum from co-designing research topics to co-delivery solutions along with different stakeholders, especially private sectors, civil society and local governments. Equal emphasis will be provided on the research process, research results and its implementation. The session will provide specific examples of demand driven research process and results from different parts of the world.

Speakers:

  • Seiya Okazaki, Mayor of Kochi, Japan
    - Perspectives and example from local government
  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University, IRDR SC member, Japan
    - Co-design to co-delivery: gaps in research process
  • Takeshi Komino, Secretary General of Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN), Japan
    - Perspectives and example from civil society
  • Antonia Yulo Loyzaga, President of National Resilience Council and UN ISDR STAG member, the Philippines
    - Perspectives and example from private sector

Moderators:

  • Rajib Shaw, Keio University, Member of UN ISDR STAG 1 and Member of Scientific Program Committee of WSSF, Japan

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Advancing Interdisciplinary Global Challenges Research Through Data Integration

In Partnership with CODATA, Committee on Data of the International Council for Science

Abstract:

The pressing and major global scientific and human issues of the 21st century (including climate change, sustainable development, disaster risk reduction) can only be addressed through research that works across disciplines to understanding complex systems, and which uses a transdisciplinary approach to turn data into knowledge and then into action. The digital revolution offers major opportunities and challenges: some disciplines have made dramatic progress in their ability to generate and analyse data, other less so. Yet, the ability to integrate diverse data from different disciplines so as to model and identify patterns in systems relating to the major challenge areas remains relatively rudimentary. In the compelling phrase of the UN Expert Report on the Data Revolution, if we are to have ‘a world that counts’, a world in which data is used to understand complex systems and inform action, then it is essential that attention is given to improving the collection, interoperability, integration and use of data.

This panel will explore these issues through the following three case studies: infectious disease, resilient cities and disaster risk reduction. In each of these areas there is a strong interface between research and action and a need to draw on data and research about human activities and natural processes. If the dynamics of complex scenarios are to be fully understood, it is essential to gather data from diverse sources and to integrate it so that it can be consistently queried and models developed.

The panelists will explore such issues from the perspective of the case studies and will then discuss what can be done to improve the availability and interoperability of important data. How can the development of standards and shared concepts, controlled vocabularies and ontologies be advanced to assist the integration of data to understand complex systems? How can such endeavours become more easily scalable so that research initiatives can invest more in analysis and planning interventions, rather than laboriously cleaning data or extracting it from outdated formats? The examples demonstrate that such issues are not a niche area of interest only for computer and information scientists but have fundamental significance for research areas of pressing and global importance. In the context of the creation of the new International Science Council – which provides a unified voice for the human and social sciences and the natural and technical sciences – the Council’s Committee on Data (ISC-CODATA) proposes a timely decadal initiative to improve and scale capacity for data integration in order that interdisciplinary research areas may take full advantage of the opportunities of the data revolution. Thanks to funding from the China Association for Science and Technology, the initiative has developed a methodology for engaging with pilot activities that exemplify the challenges and opportunities for data integration to suppose the analysis of complex systems.

Speakers:

  • Geoffrey Boulton, Officers and Executive Committee President, CODATA, France
    -‘Framing Introduction: Advancing Interdisciplinary Global Challenges Research Through Data Integration’
  • Virginia Murray, Consultant in Global Disaster Risk Reduction with Public Health England, UK
    -Disaster mortality data and measuring progress towards implementation of the Sendai Framework: how can it be done?

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Current Situation of Social Inclusion for Immigrants

Chaired by: Yoshitaka Ishikawa, National Committee of Japan for International Geographical Union (IGU)

Abstract:

Globalization is recognized as the increasing interaction in terms of the migration and the movement of people, trade and transactions, capital and investment movements, and the dissemination of knowledge. Globalization has strengthened the interdependence of economic and cultural activities among countries/regions in our contemporary world. We are deeply interested in human migration among them and focus on immigrants as the consequence of such international human flows.
International migration is also attracting much attention because parts of these countries/regions are experiencing low fertility, aging, and population decline. The new challenges of these demographic trends require comprehensive reassessments of many existing policies and programs, including those related to international migration. In this context, the United Nations report published in 2001 addressed replacement migration for eight low-fertility countries (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States) and two regions (Europe and the European Union). Replacement migration is the international migration needed by a country/region to offset population decline and population aging caused by low fertility and mortality rates.
Although we understand the idea of replacement migration, its chief concern lies in the amount of new immigration to a particular country/region. However, such an idea should be supplemented by scrutiny that focuses on whether the lives of immigrants in the destination countries are improving. In this regard, the perspective of social inclusion, which seeks to confer certain rights to all immigrants and ethnic groups in various aspects of the host society, is significant. Specific situations associated with immigrant inclusion can be investigated through employment, occupation, residence, migration, education, marriage, family formation, and so on. The importance of such perspectives is not limited to countries/regions that were studied in the United Nations report on replacement migration; it also needs to be the case for other countries/regions including such “nations of immigrants” as Australia and Canada.
We are also concentrating on diversity associated with social inclusion. Which factors can explain the differences in the current stages of social inclusion among countries/regions: historical background, immigration policy, ethnicity of immigrants, or mode of incorporation?
Keeping the above discussion in mind and focusing on geographical or sociological studies whose chief subjects are Asian immigrants, we are organizing our session called the “Current situation of social inclusion for immigrants.” This session consists of four papers by speakers from Japan, Taiwan, and Australia.
In the context of the World Social Science Forum in Fukuoka, this invited session is organized by the National Committee of Japan for the International Geographical Union (IGU), which is Japan’s IGU affiliate. IGU, which is a major member organization of the International Science Council (ISC), has approximately 40 commissions, and this session’s speakers are affiliated with the commission on Global Change and Human Mobility (Globility) that was established in 2000.

Speakers:

  • John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - Migration, social inclusion and places of difference: Australian cities in the age of Trump and Hanson
  • Ji-Ping Lin and Chyong-fang Ko (Academia Sinica /Taiwan)
    - Multiculturalism and social inclusion: changing migration policies and possible changes in Taiwan
  • Sachi Takahata (University of Shizuoka/ Japan)
    - Wives, children and Nikkei's: Filipinos coming to Japan based on the attributions
  • Shuko Takeshita (Aichi Gakuin University / Japan)
    - Social inclusion and exclusion in Japan: from the perspective of intermarriage

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Border Studies Today: Theoretical Development and Its Role in the Contemporary World

Chaired by: Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University
In Commemoration of the Completion of Ito Campus, Kyushu University

Abstract:

This edition of the World Social Science Forum focuses upon security and equality for sustainable futures, and is therefore concerned with issues of global significance. However, as a glance at the sub-themes makes clear, these global issues come to be filtered through the prism of the nation-state, and its ability to respond to the problems seen as afflicting every part of the globe. Even when adopting a transborder perspective, it is common for the humanities and social sciences to adopt an area studies approach, as is seen in Kyushu University’s focus on Asia. The aim here, however, is to seek to offer a more global perspective, both through the background of the participant and the scope of their discussion. A unique feature of border studies is its multidisciplinarity and ability to go beyond regionalism, and it is hoped that such strengths will be reflected in this roundtable, which will emphasize the central contribution to be made to resolving global issues through the study of borders, edges, and liminal spaces.

Speakers:

  • Martin van der Velde, Radboud University, Netherlands / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2014-2015, John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - European Borders Studies in the past decades
  • Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, George Mason University, USA / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2017-
    - Borders in the Americas in the Era of Trump: Walls and Closed Borders
  • Serghei Golunov, Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russia / Professor of Kyushu University: 2015-2018
    - Theory-Practice Gap in Contemporary Border Studies
  • Akihiro Iwashita, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2015-2016
    - Back to the Future: A world of “fortresses”?

Moderators:

  • Edward Boyle, Kyushu University & Mirza Zulfiqur Rahman, Indian Institute of Technology

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Addressing the Multidimensionality of Security to Achieve Agenda 2030:

In partnership with UNESCO’s Management of Social Transformations programme (MOST)

Abstract:

High and increasing insecurities (political, armed conflicts and violence, economic, environmental and social) are both drivers and consequences of other insecurities, and thus hinder the implementation of the cross-cutting Agenda 2030 to “leave no one behind”.
Norway stated at the 72nd session of the United Nations’ General Assembly in 2017 “there can be no security without development and no development without security”, emphasizing that this correlation was one premise of the Agenda 2030, one which pointed to the importance of ‘rule of law’ and ‘good governance’.

The UN Secretary-General has emphasized the importance of restoring the approach to peace and security within the UN and beyond, and of working to prevent rather than to respond to crises. In contributing to the achievement of the UNSG’s vision of integrating the UN pillars – peace and security; human rights and development – policymakers need to respond to the various challenges in a holistic framework through, inter alia, building on policy relevant research findings - which is what this session will focus on.

It is clear that, in addition to political will and funds, the “world also needs improved understanding which the World Social Science Report 2016 is designed to provide”, as stated by UNESCO in its foreword. The 38th session of UNESCO’s General Conference stressed the importance of the MOST Programme in the design of public policies based on scientific evidence to achieve the SDGs.

Sustainable Development Goal 16 focuses on promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development; providing access to justice to all; and building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. All other SDGs are directly or indirectly connected to SDG 16 and multidimensional insecurities. This shows it fundamental importance for the implementation of Agenda 2030 and the UN Charter, including its focus on security.

On the institutional level, both nationally and internationally, SDG 16 sets out to combat societal institutional problems such as corruption, illegal financial and arms flows and organized crime. Institutions must also work towards inclusivity, transparency and accountability; increase the participation of developing countries in global governance; and develop sustainable and responsible policies and laws that support the aforementioned ambitions and enforce and protect the rights of people.

The wide range of issues related to security encompassed by the SDG 16, which is of particular relevance in a world with increasing geopolitical tensions, and other forms of insecurity (food, work, health, social integration, environmental, etc.) demonstrates the multidimensionality of the concept, which, in a policy-making context, calls for further investigation to ensure that ‘no one is left behind’.

Trust is an essential element in achieving an inclusive society, at local, national and global levels. However, levels of trust between citizens, civil society organizations and public decision-making bodies, as well as between sovereign states, is increasingly being replaced by a sense of injustice, threats and polarization. This is why transparency, accountability and inclusivity, as enshrined in SDG 16, must be incorporated in better policies, and especially in policies that are preventive.

This interdisciplinary policy-oriented discussion panel at the WSSF 2018 will consider, with the participation of ministers, distinguished representatives from Permanent Delegations to UNESCO and renowned researchers, the concept of security in all its facets, and the need for social science findings to bolster policy-making on security.

Speakers:

  • Gudmund Hernes, the FAFO Institute in Oslo, BI Norwegian Business School, member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of MOST, Norway
  • Georg Peter, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Belgium
  • Maria Mourani, Québec Government Representative, Counsellor, Permanent Delegation of Canada to UNESCO, Canada
  • Melissa Leach, Geographer and socio-anthropologist, Director of the Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, UK

Moderator:

  • Heide Hackmann, Chief Executive Officer, International Science Council, France

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

From co-designing to co-delivery of risk reduction solutions

Rajib Shaw

Abstract:

A recent report on disaster science (Global Outlook of Disaster Science, 2017) by Elsevier has pointed out some crucial gaps and challenges in the disaster risk reduction research as follow: 1) the countries having highest casualty has lowest percentage of disaster research, and the countries with highest economic impacts have the maximum numbers of disaster research, 2) the countries with higher number of disaster research does not necessarily have the highest research impacts. This shows the importance of policy as well as community research. While the needs and importance of trans-, multi- and inter-disciplinary research have been discussed and highlighted in several forums, there still remains a core gap on identifying the research issues and providing need based solutions.
The proposed session will focus on the whole spectrum from co-designing research topics to co-delivery solutions along with different stakeholders, especially private sectors, civil society and local governments. Equal emphasis will be provided on the research process, research results and its implementation. The session will provide specific examples of demand driven research process and results from different parts of the world.

Speakers:

  • Seiya Okazaki, Mayor of Kochi, Japan
    - Perspectives and example from local government
  • Riyanti Djalante, United Nations University, IRDR SC member, Japan
    - Co-design to co-delivery: gaps in research process
  • Takeshi Komino, Secretary General of Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN), Japan
    - Perspectives and example from civil society
  • Antonia Yulo Loyzaga, President of National Resilience Council and UN ISDR STAG member, the Philippines
    - Perspectives and example from private sector

Moderator:

  • Rajib Shaw, Keio University, Member of UN ISDR STAG 1 and Member of Scientific Program Committee of WSSF, Japan

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Advancing Interdisciplinary Global Challenges Research Through Data Integration

Rajib Shaw

Abstract:

The pressing and major global scientific and human issues of the 21st century (including climate change, sustainable development, disaster risk reduction) can only be addressed through research that works across disciplines to understanding complex systems, and which uses a transdisciplinary approach to turn data into knowledge and then into action. The digital revolution offers major opportunities and challenges: some disciplines have made dramatic progress in their ability to generate and analyse data, other less so. Yet, the ability to integrate diverse data from different disciplines so as to model and identify patterns in systems relating to the major challenge areas remains relatively rudimentary. In the compelling phrase of the UN Expert Report on the Data Revolution, if we are to have ‘a world that counts’, a world in which data is used to understand complex systems and inform action, then it is essential that attention is given to improving the collection, interoperability, integration and use of data.

This panel will explore these issues through the following three case studies: infectious disease, resilient cities and disaster risk reduction. In each of these areas there is a strong interface between research and action and a need to draw on data and research about human activities and natural processes. If the dynamics of complex scenarios are to be fully understood, it is essential to gather data from diverse sources and to integrate it so that it can be consistently queried and models developed.

The panelists will explore such issues from the perspective of the case studies and will then discuss what can be done to improve the availability and interoperability of important data. How can the development of standards and shared concepts, controlled vocabularies and ontologies be advanced to assist the integration of data to understand complex systems? How can such endeavours become more easily scalable so that research initiatives can invest more in analysis and planning interventions, rather than laboriously cleaning data or extracting it from outdated formats? The examples demonstrate that such issues are not a niche area of interest only for computer and information scientists but have fundamental significance for research areas of pressing and global importance. In the context of the creation of the new International Science Council ? which provides a unified voice for the human and social sciences and the natural and technical sciences ? the Council’s Committee on Data (ISC-CODATA) proposes a timely decadal initiative to improve and scale capacity for data integration in order that interdisciplinary research areas may take full advantage of the opportunities of the data revolution. Thanks to funding from the China Association for Science and Technology, the initiative has developed a methodology for engaging with pilot activities that exemplify the challenges and opportunities for data integration to suppose the analysis of complex systems.

Speakers:

  • Geoffrey Boulton, Officers and Executive Committee President, CODATA, France
    -‘Framing Introduction: Advancing Interdisciplinary Global Challenges Research Through Data Integration’
  • Virginia Murray, Consultant in Global Disaster Risk Reduction with Public Health England, UK
    -Disaster mortality data and measuring progress towards implementation of the Sendai Framework: how can it be done?

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Current Situation of Social Inclusion for Immigrants

Chaired by: Yoshitaka Ishikawa, National Committee of Japan for International Geographical Union (IGU)

Abstract:

Globalization is recognized as the increasing interaction in terms of the migration and the movement of people, trade and transactions, capital and investment movements, and the dissemination of knowledge. Globalization has strengthened the interdependence of economic and cultural activities among countries/regions in our contemporary world. We are deeply interested in human migration among them and focus on immigrants as the consequence of such international human flows.
International migration is also attracting much attention because parts of these countries/regions are experiencing low fertility, aging, and population decline. The new challenges of these demographic trends require comprehensive reassessments of many existing policies and programs, including those related to international migration. In this context, the United Nations report published in 2001 addressed replacement migration for eight low-fertility countries (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States) and two regions (Europe and the European Union). Replacement migration is the international migration needed by a country/region to offset population decline and population aging caused by low fertility and mortality rates.
Although we understand the idea of replacement migration, its chief concern lies in the amount of new immigration to a particular country/region. However, such an idea should be supplemented by scrutiny that focuses on whether the lives of immigrants in the destination countries are improving. In this regard, the perspective of social inclusion, which seeks to confer certain rights to all immigrants and ethnic groups in various aspects of the host society, is significant. Specific situations associated with immigrant inclusion can be investigated through employment, occupation, residence, migration, education, marriage, family formation, and so on. The importance of such perspectives is not limited to countries/regions that were studied in the United Nations report on replacement migration; it also needs to be the case for other countries/regions including such “nations of immigrants” as Australia and Canada.
We are also concentrating on diversity associated with social inclusion. Which factors can explain the differences in the current stages of social inclusion among countries/regions: historical background, immigration policy, ethnicity of immigrants, or mode of incorporation?
Keeping the above discussion in mind and focusing on geographical or sociological studies whose chief subjects are Asian immigrants, we are organizing our session called the “Current situation of social inclusion for immigrants.” This session consists of four papers by speakers from Japan, Taiwan, and Australia.
In the context of the World Social Science Forum in Fukuoka, this invited session is organized by the National Committee of Japan for the International Geographical Union (IGU), which is Japan’s IGU affiliate. IGU, which is a major member organization of the International Social Science Council (ISSC), has approximately 40 commissions, and this session’s speakers are affiliated with the commission on Global Change and Human Mobility (Globility) that was established in 2000.

Speakers:

  • John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - Migration, social inclusion and places of difference: Australian cities in the age of Trump and Hanson
  • Ji-Ping Lin and Chyong-fang Ko (Academia Sinica /Taiwan)
    - Multiculturalism and social inclusion: changing migration policies and possible changes in Taiwan
  • Sachi Takahata (University of Shizuoka/ Japan)
    - Wives, children and Nikkei's: Filipinos coming to Japan based on the attributions
  • Shuko Takeshita (Aichi Gakuin University / Japan)
    - Social inclusion and exclusion in Japan: from the perspective of intermarriage

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Border Studies Today: Theoretical Development and Its Role in the Contemporary World

Chaired by: Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University
In Commemoration of the Completion of Ito Campus, Kyushu University

Abstract:

This edition of the World Social Science Forum focuses upon security and equality for sustainable futures, and is therefore concerned with issues of global significance. However, as a glance at the sub-themes makes clear, these global issues come to be filtered through the prism of the nation-state, and its ability to respond to the problems seen as afflicting every part of the globe. Even when adopting a transborder perspective, it is common for the humanities and social sciences to adopt an area studies approach, as is seen in Kyushu University’s focus on Asia. The aim here, however, is to seek to offer a more global perspective, both through the background of the participant and the scope of their discussion. A unique feature of border studies is its multidisciplinarity and ability to go beyond regionalism, and it is hoped that such strengths will be reflected in this roundtable, which will emphasize the central contribution to be made to resolving global issues through the study of borders, edges, and liminal spaces.

Speakers:

  • Martin van der Velde, Radboud University, Netherlands / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2014-2015, John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - European Borders Studies in the past decades
  • Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, George Mason University, USA / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2017-
    - Borders in the Americas in the Era of Trump: Walls and Closed Borders
  • Serghei Golunov, Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russia / Professor of Kyushu University: 2015-2018
    - Theory-Practice Gap in Contemporary Border Studies
  • Akihiro Iwashita, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2015-2016
    - Back to the Future: A world of “fortresses”?

Moderators:

  • Edward Boyle, Kyushu University & Mirza Zulfiqur Rahman, Indian Institute of Technology

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Addressing the Multidimensionality of Security to Achieve Agenda 2030:

In partnership with UNESCO’s Management of Social Transformations programme (MOST)

Abstract:

High and increasing insecurities (political, armed conflicts and violence, economic, environmental and social) are both drivers and consequences of other insecurities, and thus hinder the implementation of the cross-cutting Agenda 2030 to “leave no one behind”.
Norway stated at the 72nd session of the United Nations’ General Assembly in 2017 “there can be no security without development and no development without security”, emphasizing that this correlation was one premise of the Agenda 2030, one which pointed to the importance of ‘rule of law’ and ‘good governance’.

The UN Secretary-General has emphasized the importance of restoring the approach to peace and security within the UN and beyond, and of working to prevent rather than to respond to crises. In contributing to the achievement of the UNSG’s vision of integrating the UN pillars – peace and security; human rights and development – policymakers need to respond to the various challenges in a holistic framework through, inter alia, building on policy relevant research findings - which is what this session will focus on.

It is clear that, in addition to political will and funds, the “world also needs improved understanding which the World Social Science Report 2016 is designed to provide”, as stated by UNESCO in its foreword. The 38th session of UNESCO’s General Conference stressed the importance of the MOST Programme in the design of public policies based on scientific evidence to achieve the SDGs.

Sustainable Development Goal 16 focuses on promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development; providing access to justice to all; and building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. All other SDGs are directly or indirectly connected to SDG 16 and multidimensional insecurities. This shows it fundamental importance for the implementation of Agenda 2030 and the UN Charter, including its focus on security.

On the institutional level, both nationally and internationally, SDG 16 sets out to combat societal institutional problems such as corruption, illegal financial and arms flows and organized crime. Institutions must also work towards inclusivity, transparency and accountability; increase the participation of developing countries in global governance; and develop sustainable and responsible policies and laws that support the aforementioned ambitions and enforce and protect the rights of people.

The wide range of issues related to security encompassed by the SDG 16, which is of particular relevance in a world with increasing geopolitical tensions, and other forms of insecurity (food, work, health, social integration, environmental, etc.) demonstrates the multidimensionality of the concept, which, in a policy-making context, calls for further investigation to ensure that ‘no one is left behind’.

Trust is an essential element in achieving an inclusive society, at local, national and global levels. However, levels of trust between citizens, civil society organizations and public decision-making bodies, as well as between sovereign states, is increasingly being replaced by a sense of injustice, threats and polarization. This is why transparency, accountability and inclusivity, as enshrined in SDG 16, must be incorporated in better policies, and especially in policies that are preventive.

This interdisciplinary policy-oriented discussion panel at the WSSF 2018 will consider, with the participation of ministers, distinguished representatives from Permanent Delegations to UNESCO and renowned researchers, the concept of security in all its facets, and the need for social science findings to bolster policy-making on security.

Speakers:

  • Gudmund Hernes, the FAFO Institute in Oslo, BI Norwegian Business School, member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of MOST, Norway
  • Georg Peter, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Belgium
  • Maria Mourani, Québec Government Representative, Counsellor, Permanent Delegation of Canada to UNESCO, Canada
  • Melissa Leach, Geographer and socio-anthropologist, Director of the Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, UK

Moderator:

  • Heide Hackmann, Chief Executive Officer, International Science Council, France

Parallel DAY 4: CS1-03

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS1-03 Lifeworlds of Sustainability and Wellbeing in a Shrinking Japan

chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner - Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN)

Chair:

  • Steven R. McGreevy, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Steven R. McGreevy, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
    - Redefining wellbeing amongst new settlers in a whithering rural Japan
  • Naoyuki Funamizu, Sanitation Value Chain Project, RIHN, Japan
    - Water and sanitation system for a shrinking society
  • Christoph D. D. Rupprecht, FEAST Project, RIHN, Japan
    - Subsist and thrive: caring for people and nature in post-growth urban Japan
  • Peter Matanle, University of Sheffield, UK
    - Achieving the ‘Depopulation Dividend’: Japanese Developmental Leadership for the Asia-Pacific in the 21st Century
  • Yui Takase, Ibaraki University, Japan
    - Can resident-led green space management in a shrinking society be accomplished in a positive way?

Parallel DAY 4: OP1-04

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP1-04 Maritime Security in the Indo-Pacific

Chair:

  • Yoichiro Sato, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Yana Leksyutina, Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia
    -China’s logic and strategy in managing maritime disputes
  • A-chin Hsiau, Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    -The Resurgence of Memory about the “Defending the Diaoyutai Islands Movement” in Taiwan: Civil Society, Territorial Nationalism, and Peace in the East China Sea
  • OlaOluwa Alao Folami, Cuttington University, Liberia
    -Illicit Fishing Activities and Maritime Security: Interrogating Threats to South Africa’s Indian Ocean Maritime Sphere
  • Edward Kieran Boyle, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan
    -Envisioning Island Spaces: Integral territory and national fragments
  • Aisyah Maretta Anggiana, Padjadjaran University, Indonesia
    -Ship Sinking Policy: Indonesian Way to Improve Maritime Security
  • Yoichiro Sato, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan
    -China’s legal Trojan horse: Joint development of oil and gas in the disputed water as an exercise of control

coming soon

Parallel DAY 4: OP3-02

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP3-02 Reconsideration of the Welfare State in the light of Hibakusha

- chaired by WSSF Consortiuam Partner-Hitotsubashi University

Chair:

  • Reiko Gotoh, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Jean-Pierre Dupuy, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France and Stanford University, USA
    - Welfare Economics Confronts Extreme Events
  • Naoko Miyaji, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Secrets and Lies
  • Paul Dumouchel, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Catastrophe and Justice--Brute Luck, Desert, and Inequality--
  • Masaya Nemoto, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Outrage for Peace: Questionnaire Study on Hibakusha’s Thoughts and Experiences
  • Reiko Gotoh, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - State compensation for atomic bomb sufferers and Call for the total abolishment of nuclear weapons

Discussant:

  • Shin Yamada, Hiroshima Shudo University, Japan

Parallel DAY 4: CS1-03

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS1-03 Lifeworlds of Sustainability and Wellbeing in a Shrinking Japan

chaired by WSSF Consortium Partner - Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN)

Chair:

  • Steven R. McGreevy, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Steven R. McGreevy, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
    - Redefining wellbeing amongst new settlers in a whithering rural Japan
  • Naoyuki Funamizu, Sanitation Value Chain Project, RIHN, Japan
    - Water and sanitation system for a shrinking society
  • Christoph D. D. Rupprecht, FEAST Project, RIHN, Japan
    - Subsist and thrive: caring for people and nature in post-growth urban Japan
  • Peter Matanle, University of Sheffield, UK
    - Achieving the ‘Depopulation Dividend’: Japanese Developmental Leadership for the Asia-Pacific in the 21st Century
  • Yui Takase, Ibaraki University, Japan
    - Can resident-led green space management in a shrinking society be accomplished in a positive way?

Parallel DAY 4: OP1-04

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP1-04 Maritime Security in the Indo-Pacific

Chair:

  • Yoichiro Sato, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Yana Leksyutina, Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia
    -China’s logic and strategy in managing maritime disputes
  • A-chin Hsiau, Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    -The Resurgence of Memory about the “Defending the Diaoyutai Islands Movement” in Taiwan: Civil Society, Territorial Nationalism, and Peace in the East China Sea
  • OlaOluwa Alao Folami, Cuttington University, Liberia
    -Illicit Fishing Activities and Maritime Security: Interrogating Threats to South Africa’s Indian Ocean Maritime Sphere
  • Edward Kieran Boyle, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan
    -Envisioning Island Spaces: Integral territory and national fragments
  • Aisyah Maretta Anggiana, Padjadjaran University, Indonesia
    -Ship Sinking Policy: Indonesian Way to Improve Maritime Security
  • Yoichiro Sato, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Japan
    -China’s legal Trojan horse: Joint development of oil and gas in the disputed water as an exercise of control

coming soon

Parallel DAY 4: OP3-02

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP3-02 Reconsideration of the Welfare State in the light of Hibakusha

- chaired by WSSF Consortiuam Partner-Hitotsubashi University

Chair:

  • Reiko Gotoh, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Jean-Pierre Dupuy, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France and Stanford University, USA
    - Welfare Economics Confronts Extreme Events
  • Naoko Miyaji, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Secrets and Lies
  • Paul Dumouchel, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Catastrophe and Justice--Brute Luck, Desert, and Inequality--
  • Masaya Nemoto, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Outrage for Peace: Questionnaire Study on Hibakusha’s Thoughts and Experiences
  • Reiko Gotoh, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - State compensation for atomic bomb sufferers and Call for the total abolishment of nuclear weapons

Discussant:

  • Shin Yamada, Hiroshima Shudo University, Japan

Parallel DAY 4: OP3-03

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP3-03 Poverty, water and sustainable development in global change: exploring the nexus from a sustainability science and human security perspective

Chairs:

  • Alberto Cimadamore, Comparative Research on Poverty(CROP), Norway
  • Elma Montana, Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI), Uruguay

Speakers:

  • Francis Gerson Tuazon, University of Auckland Business School, New Zealand
    -Investigating Perspective Taking in Sustainability Leadership to Advance Efficacious Water Resource Management
  • Isaac Adebusuyi Adeniran, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
    -Exploring the Political Ecology of Sino-Nigerian Uneven Water Conservation Partnership
  • Ricardo Ivan Castro-Diaz, Autonomous University of Entre Rios, National Scientific and Technical Research Counci (CONICET) and CLACSO, Argentina
    -The social vulnerability and ecosystem services feedback: approaching social-ecological analysis in water supply for Andean communities (Lake of Fuquene, Colombia).
  • Stephanie Buechler, University of Arizona, US
    -Gender and Poverty Dimensions of Water, Renewable Energy and Sustainable Development Linkages in Semi-arid Arizona, USA and Zacatecas, Mexico
  • Christopher Scott, University of Arizona, US
    -Urban Wastewater for Peri-urban Agriculture in Northwest Mexico: Health Risk, Water Resources, and Sanitation Policy Challenges

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-05 Using game-based methods for sustainability transformations : lessons from practice and theory

Chair:

  • Kazuhiko Ota, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Kazuhiko Ota, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
    - Develop Food Strategies and Plans through Gaming Methods in Kyoto
  • Tomohiro Oh, RIHN, Japan
    - Incorporate Energy-Food Nexus into a Board Game: Class Practices Toward a Better Understanding of Social-Ecological Systems
  • Takamichi Ohtani, RIHN, Japan
    - Trends of Serious Game Jam in Japan
  • Juhyung Shin, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Becoming Play-Learners: Serious Games in South Korea
  • Joost Vervoort, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
    - How can societal game design capacities contribute to anticipatory governance? Comparing the Netherlands and Japan
  • Astrid Mangnus, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
    - From imagination to transformation? Evaluating the long-term impacts of visioning, back-casting and gaming on the Kyoto food system

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-09

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-09 The impact of maritime conflict and security on meeting Sustainable Development Goals

Chairs:

  • Aoi Sugimoto, Japan Fisheries & Education Agency, Japan
  • Jessica Spijkers, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden

Moderator:

  • Henrik Österblom, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden

Speakers:

  • Kazumi Wakita, Tokai University, Japan
    - Can we achieve sustainable use in the sea with conflicts: A questionnaire across three countries around the East China Sea.
  • Aoi Sugimoto, Japan Fisheries & Education Agency, Japan
    - Conflict or inclusion? - some empirical evidence on the factors influencing community residents' perception toward 'outsiders' in Japanese small islands.
  • Jessica Spijkers, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden
    - The Changing Nature of International Fishery Conflict: Forty Years of Evidence.
  • Karen Alexander, University of Tasmania,
    - Oceans and coasts, resource conflicts, and big ideas.

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-10

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-10 Key roles of social sciences in Future Earth, a global research initiative to support the sustainable development goals (SDGs)

Chair:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Institute of Decision Science for a Sustainable Society, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Amy Luers, Executive Director of Future Earth
    - On shifting Human and Local to the center of Global Environmental Change
  • Leena Srivastava, TERI University, India; co-chair of Advisory Committee, Future Earth
    - Challenges to adopting an integrated, indivisible approach to inter-linked SDGs
  • Eduardo Brondizio, Indiana University, USA
    - What happened to the “human dimensions” box? Reflections on the social sciences from global change research programs to Future Earth
  • Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
    - Co-creation of knowledge partnering with vulnerable sectors: a missing component in the Future Earth processes
  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Decision Science as an integrator of social and natural sciences for Future Earth

Parallel DAY 4: OP3-03

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP3-03 Poverty, water and sustainable development in global change: exploring the nexus from a sustainability science and human security perspective

Chairs:

  • Alberto Cimadamore, Comparative Research on Poverty(CROP), Norway
  • Elma Montana, Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI), Uruguay

Speakers:

  • Francis Gerson Tuazon, University of Auckland Business School, New Zealand
    -Investigating Perspective Taking in Sustainability Leadership to Advance Efficacious Water Resource Management
  • Isaac Adebusuyi Adeniran, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
    -Exploring the Political Ecology of Sino-Nigerian Uneven Water Conservation Partnership
  • Ricardo Ivan Castro-Diaz, Autonomous University of Entre Rios, National Scientific and Technical Research Counci (CONICET) and CLACSO, Argentina
    -The social vulnerability and ecosystem services feedback: approaching social-ecological analysis in water supply for Andean communities (Lake of Fuquene, Colombia).
  • Stephanie Buechler, University of Arizona, US
    -Gender and Poverty Dimensions of Water, Renewable Energy and Sustainable Development Linkages in Semi-arid Arizona, USA and Zacatecas, Mexico
  • Christopher Scott, University of Arizona, US
    -Urban Wastewater for Peri-urban Agriculture in Northwest Mexico: Health Risk, Water Resources, and Sanitation Policy Challenges

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-05 Using game-based methods for sustainability transformations : lessons from practice and theory

Chair:

  • Kazuhiko Ota, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan

Speakers:

  • Kazuhiko Ota, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan
    - Develop Food Strategies and Plans through Gaming Methods in Kyoto
  • Tomohiro Oh, RIHN, Japan
    - Incorporate Energy-Food Nexus into a Board Game: Class Practices Toward a Better Understanding of Social-Ecological Systems
  • Takamichi Ohtani, RIHN, Japan
    - Trends of Serious Game Jam in Japan
  • Juhyung Shin, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
    - Becoming Play-Learners: Serious Games in South Korea
  • Joost Vervoort, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
    - How can societal game design capacities contribute to anticipatory governance? Comparing the Netherlands and Japan
  • Astrid Mangnus, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
    - From imagination to transformation? Evaluating the long-term impacts of visioning, back-casting and gaming on the Kyoto food system

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-09

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-09 The impact of maritime conflict and security on meeting Sustainable Development Goals

Chairs:

  • Aoi Sugimoto, Japan Fisheries & Education Agency, Japan
  • Jessica Spijkers, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden

Moderator:

  • Henrik Österblom, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden

Speakers:

  • Kazumi Wakita, Tokai University, Japan
    - Can we achieve sustainable use in the sea with conflicts: A questionnaire across three countries around the East China Sea.
  • Aoi Sugimoto, Japan Fisheries & Education Agency, Japan
    - Conflict or inclusion? - some empirical evidence on the factors influencing community residents' perception toward 'outsiders' in Japanese small islands.
  • Jessica Spijkers, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden
    - The Changing Nature of International Fishery Conflict: Forty Years of Evidence.
  • Karen Alexander, University of Tasmania,
    - Oceans and coasts, resource conflicts, and big ideas.

Parallel DAY 4: CS4-10

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS4-10 Key roles of social sciences in Future Earth, a global research initiative to support the sustainable development goals (SDGs)

Chair:

  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Institute of Decision Science for a Sustainable Society, Kyushu University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Amy Luers, Executive Director of Future Earth
    - On shifting Human and Local to the center of Global Environmental Change
  • Leena Srivastava, TERI University, India; co-chair of Advisory Committee, Future Earth
    - Challenges to adopting an integrated, indivisible approach to inter-linked SDGs
  • Eduardo Brondizio, Indiana University, USA
    - What happened to the “human dimensions” box? Reflections on the social sciences from global change research programs to Future Earth
  • Tetsu Sato, Ehime University, Japan
    - Co-creation of knowledge partnering with vulnerable sectors: a missing component in the Future Earth processes
  • Tetsukazu Yahara, Kyushu University, Japan
    - Decision Science as an integrator of social and natural sciences for Future Earth

Parallel DAY 4: CS5-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS5-05 Narratives of identity and visions of sustainable futures in diverse cultures and contexts

Chair:

  • Ilan Chabay, Institute For Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany; Arizona State University, USA

Speakers:

  • Sander van der Leeuw, Arizona State University; Santa Fe Institute, USA
    - Narratives of identity and visions of sustainable futures in diverse cultures and contexts
  • Belay Begashaw, the Sustainable Development Goals Center for Africa (SDGC/A), Rwanda
    - Highlighting potential divergence points and perspectives between the Global North and Global South regarding socio-ecological services
  • Grit Martinez, Ecologic Institute, Germany
    - Socio-cultural narratives, meaning making and the trajectories of sustainability transitions
  • Ilan Chabay, Institute For Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany; Arizona State University, USA
    - Social dynamics of collective behavior change to sustainable futures from narratives of vision and identity

Parallel DAY 4: OP5-02

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP5-02 Sustainable Innovation through Diversity

Chair:

  • Reiko Aoki, Science Council of Japan and Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan

Speakers:

  • Teruo Kishi, Science and Technology Advisor to the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Professor Emeritus, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Science Diplomacy for SDGs – Bridging Diverse Stakeholders-
  • Yuko Harayama, Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CSTI), Japan
    - Science, Technology & Innovation (STI) for SDGs
  • Haruna Miyagawa, Okayama University, Japan
    - Revisiting “Diversity” in Higher Education: A Case Study
  • Yuan Yuan, National Institute of Informatics and East China Normal University, China
    - M&A and technology transfer: Evidence from Japanese companies acquired by Chinese companies
  • Sadao Nagaoka, Tokyo Keizai University and RIETI & NISTEP, Japan
    -International collaborations in science, why and how: evidence from scientists’ survey in the US and Japan

coming soon

coming soon

Parallel DAY 4: CS5-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

CS5-05 Narratives of identity and visions of sustainable futures in diverse cultures and contexts

Chair:

  • Ilan Chabay, Institute For Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany; Arizona State University, USA

Speakers:

  • Sander van der Leeuw, Arizona State University; Santa Fe Institute, USA
    - Narratives of identity and visions of sustainable futures in diverse cultures and contexts
  • Belay Begashaw, the Sustainable Development Goals Center for Africa (SDGC/A), Rwanda
    - Highlighting potential divergence points and perspectives between the Global North and Global South regarding socio-ecological services
  • Grit Martinez, Ecologic Institute, Germany
    - Socio-cultural narratives, meaning making and the trajectories of sustainability transitions
  • Ilan Chabay, Institute For Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany; Arizona State University, USA
    - Social dynamics of collective behavior change to sustainable futures from narratives of vision and identity

Parallel DAY 4: OP5-02

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP5-02 Sustainable Innovation through Diversity

Chair:

  • Reiko Aoki, Science Council of Japan and Japan Fair Trade Commission, Japan

Speakers:

  • Teruo Kishi, Science and Technology Advisor to the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Professor Emeritus, the University of Tokyo, Japan
    - Science Diplomacy for SDGs – Bridging Diverse Stakeholders-
  • Yuko Harayama, Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CSTI), Japan
    - Science, Technology & Innovation (STI) for SDGs
  • Haruna Miyagawa, Okayama University, Japan
    - Revisiting “Diversity” in Higher Education: A Case Study
  • Yuan Yuan, National Institute of Informatics and East China Normal University, China
    - M&A and technology transfer: Evidence from Japanese companies acquired by Chinese companies
  • Sadao Nagaoka, Tokyo Keizai University and RIETI & NISTEP, Japan
    -International collaborations in science, why and how: evidence from scientists’ survey in the US and Japan

coming soon

coming soon

coming soon

Parallel DAY 4: OP9-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP9-05 New Universalities and African Potentials: Alternative Methods for Addressing Human Security Issues

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda, Kyoto University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Motoji Matsuda, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Explanation of the Panel
  • Michael Neocosmos, Rhodes University, South Africa
    - Poli African Potentials for Universal Freedom, Democracy and Human Security
  • Eisei Kurimoto, Osaka University, Japan
    - Does International Humanitarianism Assume the Universal Humanity?: Undermining the African Potentials in South Sudan?
  • Shoko Yamada, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Being educated or being schooled? The potential of African traditional notion of ‘educated man’ in the era of sustainable development and globalization
  • Rangarirai Gavin Muchetu, Doshisha University, Zimbabwe
    - The power of peasant cooperatives in agricultural markets

coming soon

Parallel DAY 4: OP9-05

14:00-16:00 Friday / 28-Sept

OP9-05 New Universalities and African Potentials: Alternative Methods for Addressing Human Security Issues

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda, Kyoto University, Japan

Speakers:

  • Motoji Matsuda, Kyoto University, Japan
    - Explanation of the Panel
  • Michael Neocosmos, Rhodes University, South Africa
    - Poli African Potentials for Universal Freedom, Democracy and Human Security
  • Eisei Kurimoto, Osaka University, Japan
    - Does International Humanitarianism Assume the Universal Humanity?: Undermining the African Potentials in South Sudan?
  • Shoko Yamada, Nagoya University, Japan
    - Being educated or being schooled? The potential of African traditional notion of ‘educated man’ in the era of sustainable development and globalization
  • Rangarirai Gavin Muchetu, Doshisha University, Zimbabwe
    - The power of peasant cooperatives in agricultural markets