WSSF

World Social Science Forum 2018

Sep, 25-28, 2018 FUKUOKA, JAPAN

Security and Equality for Sustainable Futures

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  Program  

25-SEP / DAY 1 / PROGRAM

DAY 1

Tuesday / 25-Sept
12:30-14:00

Plenary DAY1

Existential Risks

ISSC&ICSU

Abstract:

The last four decades have seen the development of new forms of war and conflict, environmental change, emerging risks from new technology and growing tensions due to increasing numbers of refugees and displaced people. The future of humanity, may well be determined by how we deal with these issues.

One of the world’s most famous social scientists, Craig Calhoun, President of the Berggruen Institute, will moderate a forward-looking discussion of existential risks, hearing from a unique group of leading experts such as the prominent astrophysicist Martin Rees, co-founder of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk; the ‘renegade economist’ Kate Raworth, author of the best-selling book Doughnut Economics – Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist; the peace and conflict resolution expert and former Minister of Environmental Development (Morelos, Mexico) Ursula Oswald Spring; as well as Emiko Okuyama who, as Mayor of Sendai, played a critical role in the reconstruction of the city after the 2011 tsunami.

Speakers:

  • Lord Martin Rees, Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge
  • Kate Raworth, Senior Visiting Research Associate, Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
  • Úrsula Oswald Spring, Researcher, the National University of Mexico-Regional Multidisciplinary Research Center (CRIM-UNAMU)
  • Emiko Okuyama, Former Mayor of the City of Sendai 2009-2017

Moderator: Craig Calhoun, President of Berggruen Institute and Former Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science

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  • *Information of Chairs, Speakers and Presentation Titles for Parallel, Topical and Poser will be available shortly.

26-SEP / DAY 2 / PROGRAM

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY2

Secured Co-evolution of Human and Artificial Intelligence: Role of Social Science and Humanities for SDGs

Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)

Abstract:

Advancement of the emerging technology represented by Artificial Intelligence (AI) using big data is expected to bring more efficient and wealthy life for human beings in the future. It is likely to be a major agent for the enrichment of inclusive wealth, a new measure of human wealth with considerations to natural and health capital. Since the economic impact of AI is enormous, companies as well as nations have invested a huge amount of money in Research and Development (R&D) on AI and the competition becomes intense. AI has a great potential to contribute to realize SDGs as Mr. Achim Steiner, Administrator of UNDP, stated to the press in Tokyo in August 2017. The Japanese 5th Science and Technology Basic Plan adopted by the cabinet in 2016 states realization of world-leading “Super Smart Society (Society 5.0)” and AI is a key technology to make it happen and as a national funding agency, JST promotes R&D on AI.
On the other hand, it is globally pointed out that AI might bring about new issues such as new types of crime, unforeseen troubles and incidents, inequality and disparity.
It is important to discuss how we could foster a healthy development of AI from the human-centric perspective to optimize the benefit of the emerging technology and reduce its risk.
Social Science and Humanities (SSH) has been expected to play an important role in this respect. SSH provides essential knowledge to respond properly for Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) and Ethics, Legal, Social Implication (ELSI), which are requirements for R&D on AI. SSH also has a potential to contribute to promote CSV (Creating Shared Value) activities of the company.
This session will focus on the relation between human society and R&D on AI. The company CEO, SSH researchers and AI scientist will get together for this session to discuss how we could promote the harmonization and interaction between R&D on AI and human society, namely co-design and co-production of R&D beyond disciplines and social sectors for mutually sustainable development, taking into account the speed of Advancement of AI and its significant impact on people’s life. Specifically they would talk about topics such as “Would social and economic development driven by AI contribute to reduce inequality, improve people’s safety and well-being, and realize sustainable future?”, “What kind of risk would exist?, “What would be the role of SSH in the process of development of AI?”, “Would it be necessary to develop a new type of SSH researchers?” and “How could we measure the well-being of people in AI embedded society?”.
The session would also contribute to address the development of a new type of Industry-Academia collaboration, mainly conducted by SSH community, which differs from conventional business school oriented collaboration with the industry. Natural Science has been playing a dominant role in the Industry-Academia collaboration, and even where SSH plays a role, the collaboration has been active mainly in Economics and Business Administration, represented by MOT (Management of Technology) and case studies. The collaboration between Industry and SSH community other than Economics and Business Administration remains limited.
A super smart society (Society 5.0) is characterized as follows:
a society that is capable of providing the necessary goods and services to the people who need them at the required time and in just the right amount; a society that is able to respond precisely to a wide variety of social needs; a society in which all kinds of people can readily obtain high quality services, overcome differences of age, gender, region, and language, and live vigorous and comfortable lives.

Speakers:

  • Jiro Kokuryo, Vice President, Keio University and JST Program Supervisor
  • Urs Gasser, Executive Director, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
  • Katsumi Emura, Executive Vice President, CTO, NEC Corporation
  • Haiyuan Wu, Executive Director and Vice President, Wakayama University

Chair:

  • Jiro Kokuryo, Vice President, Keio University and JST Program Supervisor

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

(Re)Framing Security: Addressing Gender, Violence, and Resilience

International Sociological Association (ISA), Margaret Abraham, Elisa Reis

Abstract:

Tackling the problem of gender and violence is key to dealing with issues of equality and security. Drawing upon different situational contexts, the panelists will explore some of the key issues in situating gender, violence, vulnerabilities and resilience in the framing of human security. Not only are gender diversity and critical feminist perspectives marginal and/or absent in institutions, the distribution of social capital by gender is uneven, with women possessing less bridging and linking social capital. Collectively, these affect the social and political capacities of women to mobilize resources to materialize desired outcomes. Apart from identifying the causes, manifestations of violence and normalisation of unequal gender and power relations in everyday experiences, and reflecting on their implications for human security, the panelists will also highlight the forms of resilience, empowerment and mobilizations to counter violence, reduce vulnerabilities and bring about structural change. Focusing on environment and climate change, sexual harassment in academia, domestic violence and legal structures, the panelists will share concrete strategies/measures that researchers together with stakeholders can offer to mitigate violence, enhance gender equality and security.

Speakers:

  • Vineeta Sinha (National University of Singapore / Singapore)
    -Gender Violence and Sexual Harassment in Academia
  • Margaret Abraham (Hofstra University / USA)
    -Toward Gender Equality and Security: Mitigating Domestic Violence
  • Aisa Kiyosue (Muroran Institute of Technology / Japan)
    -Reconsidering Article 24 of the Constitution of Japan as Pacifism: Non-violent Society and Families
  • Emma Porio (Ateneo de Manila University / Philippines)
    -Gender, Social Capital and Well-Being: Building Adaptive Capacities and Climate Resilience in Disaster Prone Communities in the Philippines

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Social Policy Development in the Age of Big Data

In partnership with the International Network of Government Science Advisors (INGSA)

Abstract:

As governments have access to more data about their populations, the potential for big data to assist in social sector policy development is being realised. Big data techniques offer the opportunities to empirically explore many issues that until now have been largely addressed though normative approaches. They also can identify relationships that have previously been unsuspected. Early experience have already demonstrated that integrated data approaches can lead to important new understandings and policy approaches. However these early experiences also reveal a number of challenges. This session will explore both the opportunities and problems that have emerged.
Perhaps the biggest opportunity lies in the ‘social investment’ paradigm whereby policy makers can explore the relationships between different social domains that have traditionally been managed in policy silos. This requires a highly integrated database. Such citizen-based analytics must be informed by an intellectual framework that creates plausible models and can explore both an understanding of the systems understudy as well as exploring programme effectiveness and options. A key issue to be resolved is that of client level service provision that is necessary if big data is to be used to assess the effectiveness of particular programmes. The risks of biases in the analysis need to be understood and this will become greater as artificial intelligence is used to explore very large data sets.
Issues of social license, data privacy and integrity, data sovereignty and of the distinction to be made between policy research use and compliance uses are important. Experience to date shows that there are major challenges in data curation and in developing the policy toolbox needed to safely and optimally use big data in policy making. There is also the danger of naïve use and interpretation by politicians. A key issue is that of how data governance is established within government agencies and across government to sustain social license.

Chair:

  • Sir Peter Gluckman (Chair of INGSA)

Speakers:

  • Richie Poulton (the Ministry of Social Development and the Social Investment Agency / New Zealand)
    - to give a general overview and discussion of the social investment approach
  • Ann Mettler; (European Political Strategy Center, European Commission) or Vladimir Sucha (Joint Research Centre of the European Commission)
    - Data and fairness; opportunities that big data provides to enhance the lives of citizens
  • Madiagne Diallo (the Treasury, Senegal and INGSA Africa Executive)
    - Data as an aid to policy decision making
  • Katherine Oliver (Oxford University / UK)
    - Data – its impact on policy processes

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Indigenous Studies at the Crossroads of Globalization and Settler Colonialism

Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA), Motoji Matsuda, Yoshinobu Ota

Abstract:

As signaled, in 2007, by the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples, the indigenous peoples seem to have reentered as subjects into the World History. The historical forces behind the global indigenous resurgence, are twofold: on the one hand, globalization in James Clifford’s term as “the evolving world of connectivities” and a critique of settler colonialism in Patrick Wolfe’s sense, a process of decolonization reinvented in the twenty-first century, on the other. By recognizing the present conjuncture as constituted by these complex yet opposing historical forces, this panel explores possibilities in rearticulating, from such overlapping disciplinary perspectives as history, political science, cultural studies and anthropology, the relations with the indigenous studies, a distinct field of investigation, as the body of knowledge in which meanings of such relational issues as memory, identity, reconciliation, ethics, responsibility and justice become re-opened and contested.

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda (President of Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA)) (Kyoto University; Anthropology)

Keynote Speaker:

  • James Clifford (Emeritus Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz; Cultural Theory)
    - Reflections on becoming indigenous

Speakers:

  • Hirofumi Kato (Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University; Archeology)
    - Decolonization and Indigenous archaeology
  • Yasuo Tsuji(School of Law, Hokkaido University; Political Theory)
    - Multiculturalism and revitalization of diminished culture
  • Yoshinobu Ota (Faculty of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University; Anthropology)
    - Unpacking Meanings of “Coming Home”

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

What Does Security Mean in Asia?: Mainstream and Critical Perspectives

Japanese Political Science Association (JPSA), Makoto Kobayashi

Abstract:

Security has been the core concept to constitute the formation of not only the discipline of International Relations but also social science in general. The connotation and significance of the concept is not necessarily, however, clear and it has brought many sorts of controversies. Security is sometimes considered to be a transcendental starting point with which we begin theorizing the various social relations on the one hand, but on the other hand the concept of security is often thoroughly criticized and deconstructed by some researchers opposing statism and conservatism. Security is in this sense outstandingly controversial issue when we discuss on social relations and it may become a barrier that hinders fruitful exchanges among the scholars of social sciences.
This session is organized in order to overcome this futile situation, and to gather the wide range of knowledge beyond the limited frontiers of disciplines. Our premise is that we should rethink the concept of security from a critical perspective but at the same time we should avoid the discourse to completely deny the traditional concept of national security. The concept of "human security," which is proposed to renovate the security controversy, may be useful to restart the discussion, but thus far human security seems to work as a practical tool for policy making and not for an instructive guide of investigation.
For our breakthrough of this deadlocked situation, we develop a critical debate from those three aspects: nuclear power stations, gender, and Okinawa. These items are usually treated as peripheral issues in the traditional security studies but even the traditional scholars of security have noticed that these issues are getting more and more importance when we talk of security matters. Admittedly, we cannot criticize the traditional security studies only by pointing out the significance of those new issues. Therefore, in this session, we aim at developing our critical thinking towards both traditional and radical security studies, in the line of those new type of critical security studies of recently emerging mainly in European countries. Furthermore, we will not limit our discussion in the field of security studies of International Relations, but pursue wider range of interactions over various types of borders such as domestic/international, center/periphery, male/female, political/apolitical, and public/private.

Chair:

  • Makoto Kobayashi (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan )

Speakers:

  • Hiroshi Sasaki (Niigata University of International and Information Studies /Japan)
    -“Security” of the Periphery and the Future generations: Case of the Problem of Nuclear Power Plants.
  • Ki-young, Shin (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan)
    - Gender, Political Representation and National Security Policy in Northeast Asia
  • Manabu Sato (Faculty of Law, Okinawa International University / Japan)
    - How real is realism?

Discussant:

  • Seiji Endo (Faculty of Law, Seikei University / Japan)

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Building a safer future through social progress

In partnership with International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Abstract:

Our world is facing many threats, which jeopardize the tremendous achievements of the last decades and centuries in which longevity has been almost doubled for most populations, and absolute poverty has been considerably reduced through development. Most of these threats come from problems that human societies inflict upon themselves: development gaps, inequalities, geopolitical and internal conflicts, environment degradation, microbial resistance. Even threats of a global scale like climate change can be traced to human behavior: mismanagement of energy sources and production-consumption patterns. Lack of social cohesion, and bad governance in the form of capture of decision-making by special interests, appear as key factors behind all these problems. The International Panel of Social Progress, in its First Report, argues that tackling the root causes of the current threats requires addressing the current social problems and promoting social progress more decisively. Its four speakers will talk about a security threat in connection with its social roots:

Speakers:

  • Elisa Reis (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
    - on socio-cultural conflicts and belonging
  • Vivian Lin (La Trobe University, Australia)
    - on public health threats and their roots in inequalities
  • Hideaki Shinoda (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan)
    - on peace-building and social issues
  • Ingrid Volkmer (University of Melbourne, Australia)
    - on the global public sphere in the digital age

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

(Re)Framing Security: Addressing Gender, Violence, and Resilience

Organized by: International Sociological Association (ISA), Margaret Abraham, Elisa Reis

Abstract:

Tackling the problem of gender and violence is key to dealing with issues of equality and security. Drawing upon different situational contexts, the panelists will explore some of the key issues in situating gender, violence, vulnerabilities and resilience in the framing of human security. Not only are gender diversity and critical feminist perspectives marginal and/or absent in institutions, the distribution of social capital by gender is uneven, with women possessing less bridging and linking social capital. Collectively, these affect the social and political capacities of women to mobilize resources to materialize desired outcomes. Apart from identifying the causes, manifestations of violence and normalisation of unequal gender and power relations in everyday experiences, and reflecting on their implications for human security, the panelists will also highlight the forms of resilience, empowerment and mobilizations to counter violence, reduce vulnerabilities and bring about structural change. Focusing on environment and climate change, sexual harassment in academia, domestic violence and legal structures, the panelists will share concrete strategies/measures that researchers together with stakeholders can offer to mitigate violence, enhance gender equality and security.

Speakers:

  • Vineeta Sinha (National University of Singapore / Singapore)
    -Gender Violence and Sexual Harassment in Academia
  • Margaret Abraham (Hofstra University / USA)
    -Toward Gender Equality and Security: Mitigating Domestic Violence
  • Aisa Kiyosue (Muroran Institute of Technology / Japan)
    -Reconsidering Article 24 of the Constitution of Japan as Pacifism: Non-violent Society and Families
  • Emma Porio (Ateneo de Manila University / Philippines)
    -Gender, Social Capital and Well-Being: Building Adaptive Capacities and Climate Resilience in Disaster Prone Communities in the Philippines

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Social Policy Development in the Age of Big Data

In partnership with the International Network of Government Science Advisors (INGSA)

Abstract:

As governments have access to more data about their populations, the potential for big data to assist in social sector policy development is being realised. Big data techniques offer the opportunities to empirically explore many issues that until now have been largely addressed though normative approaches. They also can identify relationships that have previously been unsuspected. Early experience have already demonstrated that integrated data approaches can lead to important new understandings and policy approaches. However these early experiences also reveal a number of challenges. This session will explore both the opportunities and problems that have emerged.
Perhaps the biggest opportunity lies in the ‘social investment’ paradigm whereby policy makers can explore the relationships between different social domains that have traditionally been managed in policy silos. This requires a highly integrated database. Such citizen-based analytics must be informed by an intellectual framework that creates plausible models and can explore both an understanding of the systems understudy as well as exploring programme effectiveness and options. A key issue to be resolved is that of client level service provision that is necessary if big data is to be used to assess the effectiveness of particular programmes. The risks of biases in the analysis need to be understood and this will become greater as artificial intelligence is used to explore very large data sets.
Issues of social license, data privacy and integrity, data sovereignty and of the distinction to be made between policy research use and compliance uses are important. Experience to date shows that there are major challenges in data curation and in developing the policy toolbox needed to safely and optimally use big data in policy making. There is also the danger of naïve use and interpretation by politicians. A key issue is that of how data governance is established within government agencies and across government to sustain social license.

Chair:

  • Sir Peter Gluckman (Chair of INGSA)

Speakers:

  • Richie Poulton (the Ministry of Social Development and the Social Investment Agency / New Zealand)
    - to give a general overview and discussion of the social investment approach
  • Ann Mettler; (European Political Strategy Center, European Commission) or Vladimir Sucha (Joint Research Centre of the European Commission)
    - Data and fairness; opportunities that big data provides to enhance the lives of citizens
  • Madiagne Diallo (the Treasury, Senegal and INGSA Africa Executive)
    - Data as an aid to policy decision making
  • Katherine Oliver (Oxford University / UK)

  • - Data – its impact on policy processes

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Indigenous Studies at the Crossroads of Globalization and Settler Colonialism

Organized by: Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA), Motoji Matsuda, Yoshinobu Ota

Abstract:

As signaled, in 2007, by the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples, the indigenous peoples seem to have reentered as subjects into the World History. The historical forces behind the global indigenous resurgence, are twofold: on the one hand, globalization in James Clifford’s term as “the evolving world of connectivities” and a critique of settler colonialism in Patrick Wolfe’s sense, a process of decolonization reinvented in the twenty-first century, on the other. By recognizing the present conjuncture as constituted by these complex yet opposing historical forces, this panel explores possibilities in rearticulating, from such overlapping disciplinary perspectives as history, political science, cultural studies and anthropology, the relations with the indigenous studies, a distinct field of investigation, as the body of knowledge in which meanings of such relational issues as memory, identity, reconciliation, ethics, responsibility and justice become re-opened and contested.

Chair:

  • Motoji Matsuda (President of Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology (JASCA)) (Kyoto University; Anthropology)

Keynote Speaker:

  • James Clifford (Emeritus Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz; Cultural Theory)
  • - Reflections on becoming indigenous

Speakers:

  • Hirofumi Kato (Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University; Archeology)
    - Decolonization and Indigenous archaeology
  • Yasuo Tsuji(School of Law, Hokkaido University; Political Theory)
    - Multiculturalism and revitalization of diminished culture
  • Yoshinobu Ota (Faculty of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University; Anthropology)
    - Unpacking Meanings of “Coming Home”

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

What Does Security Mean in Asia?: Mainstream and Critical Perspectives

Organized by: Japanese Political Science Association (JPSA), Makoto Kobayashi

Abstract:

Security has been the core concept to constitute the formation of not only the discipline of International Relations but also social science in general. The connotation and significance of the concept is not necessarily, however, clear and it has brought many sorts of controversies. Security is sometimes considered to be a transcendental starting point with which we begin theorizing the various social relations on the one hand, but on the other hand the concept of security is often thoroughly criticized and deconstructed by some researchers opposing statism and conservatism. Security is in this sense outstandingly controversial issue when we discuss on social relations and it may become a barrier that hinders fruitful exchanges among the scholars of social sciences.
This session is organized in order to overcome this futile situation, and to gather the wide range of knowledge beyond the limited frontiers of disciplines. Our premise is that we should rethink the concept of security from a critical perspective but at the same time we should avoid the discourse to completely deny the traditional concept of national security. The concept of "human security," which is proposed to renovate the security controversy, may be useful to restart the discussion, but thus far human security seems to work as a practical tool for policy making and not for an instructive guide of investigation.
For our breakthrough of this deadlocked situation, we develop a critical debate from those three aspects: nuclear power stations, gender, and Okinawa. These items are usually treated as peripheral issues in the traditional security studies but even the traditional scholars of security have noticed that these issues are getting more and more importance when we talk of security matters. Admittedly, we cannot criticize the traditional security studies only by pointing out the significance of those new issues. Therefore, in this session, we aim at developing our critical thinking towards both traditional and radical security studies, in the line of those new type of critical security studies of recently emerging mainly in European countries. Furthermore, we will not limit our discussion in the field of security studies of International Relations, but pursue wider range of interactions over various types of borders such as domestic/international, center/periphery, male/female, political/apolitical, and public/private.

Chair:

  • Makoto Kobayashi (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan )

Speakers:

  • Hiroshi Sasaki (Niigata University of International and Information Studies /Japan)
    -“Security” of the Periphery and the Future generations: Case of the Problem of Nuclear Power Plants.
  • Ki-young, Shin (Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University / Japan)
    - Gender, Political Representation and National Security Policy in Northeast Asia
  • Manabu Sato (Faculty of Law, Okinawa International University / Japan)
    - How real is realism?

Discussant:

  • Seiji Endo (Faculty of Law, Seikei University / Japan)

DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 2

Building a safer future through social progress

In partnership with International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP)

Abstract:

Our world is facing many threats, which jeopardize the tremendous achievements of the last decades and centuries in which longevity has been almost doubled for most populations, and absolute poverty has been considerably reduced through development. Most of these threats come from problems that human societies inflict upon themselves: development gaps, inequalities, geopolitical and internal conflicts, environment degradation, microbial resistance. Even threats of a global scale like climate change can be traced to human behavior: mismanagement of energy sources and production-consumption patterns. Lack of social cohesion, and bad governance in the form of capture of decision-making by special interests, appear as key factors behind all these problems. The International Panel of Social Progress, in its First Report, argues that tackling the root causes of the current threats requires addressing the current social problems and promoting social progress more decisively. Its four speakers will talk about a security threat in connection with its social roots:

Speakers:

  • Elisa Reis (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
    - on socio-cultural conflicts and belonging
  • Vivian Lin (La Trobe University, Australia)
    - on public health threats and their roots in inequalities
  • Hideaki Shinoda (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan)
    - on peace-building and social issues
  • Ingrid Volkmer (University of Melbourne, Australia)
    - on the global public sphere in the digital age

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DAY 2

Wednesday / 26-Sept
18:30-20:00

Plenary Evening DAY2

Inclusive Wealth and Security

Kyushu University

Abstract:

Many agencies, including the World Bank, UNEP, OECD, and UN Statistical Division remain actively engaged in wealth accounting projects. While such projects may differ in their semantic label or main focus, the institutions overseeing them aim to meet constant international demands for data and information related to wealth accounting and developmental measurement. Among these undertakings, recent Inclusive Wealth Reports (IWR) have been well-received in countries throughout South America, Central America, Africa and Asia for their assessments of the three forms of capital inherent in the overall wealth of nations.
In order to make the IWR more expansive, the 2018 edition (just finished now and will be published in 2018) further emphasize the linkages between scientific data and policies and highlight policy implications at local, national, and regional levels. To date, a lack of data availability among project contributors has been a considerable obstacle to creating a more comprehensive report.
Throughout the construction of IWR 2018, priority is placed on extending the outreach activities among project contributors to include greater numbers of organizational collaborators from around the world. IWR 2018 thus be forged through ample, global, multilateral data sharing and operational collaboration.

Speakers:

  • Sir Partha Dasgupta, Frank Ramsey Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Cambridge
  • Barbara Fraumeni, Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
  • Pushpam Kumar, Senior Economic Advisor, United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)

Moderator: Shunsuke Managi, Kyushu University

27-SEP / DAY 3 / PROGRAM

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY3

Regional Leadership and Security in a Neo-Nationalist Era: A focus on Southeast Asia

Kyushu University

Abstract:

Nationalism in Asia is regaining momentum. Governments in the region are being pressured by public discontent, economic globalization and regional integration, resulting into reduced commitment to the international liberal order. Growing tensions between neighboring countries are also threatening to lead to military conflicts. What are the prospects for a regional convergence of interests that could provide the basis for a positive sum game between Asian nations? Are the conditions conducive to greater regional economic, social and political security there? Can specific ASEAN nations play a leadership role in fostering greater interdependency and security? A deeper understanding of regional factors and actors is crucial to devise successful strategies for enduring security. We would highlight the case on the leadership role and their perspectives onto convincing Myanmar back in the international order especially during the post Nargis disaster. It was a regional initiative which ASEAN’s collective concern and aid vis-a-vis the growing number of casualties claimed by the natural disaster triumphed Myanmar’s national security concerns. This was a historical achievement since this took place against an ironclad military junta, breaking the limits of UN and major power’s initiatives. From the dialogue on these security issues which overlaps the idea of national security and humanitarian intervention, the key leaders and academics, would discuss how regionalism, especially ASEAN, made a difference. The lessons from their inclusive leadership skills may emerge to foster sustainable growth in Asia and beyond.

Speakers:

  • Kasit Piromya, Former Foreign Minister of Thailand
  • Takashi Shiraishi, Chancellor, Prefectural University of Kumamoto and Professor Emeritus, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)
  • Hassan Wirajuda, Former Foreign Minister of Indonesia

Moderator: Nobuhiro Aizawa, Kyushu University

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Engaging key stakeholders in addressing biosecurity challenges: Insights from the social sciences

In partnership with the Inter Academy partnership (IAP)

Background:

Many scientific advances – from Alfred Nobel’s dynamite, to the discovery of nuclear fission and now artificial intelligence and robotics – can be used for good or for harm.
Recent advances in biotechnology, including synthetic biology and genome editing, also fall into this category of dual-use research, raising the spectre of issues relating to biosecurity.
In the context of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), which was ratified in 1975, biosecurity is – “most commonly used to refer to mechanisms to establish and maintain the security and oversight of pathogenic microorganisms, toxins and relevant resources”.
However, major epidemics of infectious diseases such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the West African Ebola epidemic of 2013-2016 have highlighted the fact that biosecurity issues may emerge ‘naturally’ rather than by deliberate malfeasance.
In addition, rapid strides are being made in molecular biology and other relevant fields. Recent advances in synthetic biology and genome editing, such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system, for example, allow the manipulation of organisms with new levels of precision and at much cheaper costs – making it possible for a reasonably-well trained scientist or laboratory technician to carry out biotech procedures far from the public eye (there is even a growing DIY synthetic biology initiative).
Indeed, the fact that genome editing has been identified as a potential weapon of mass destruction by the U.S. Intelligence Community in its ‘Worldwide Threat Assessment’ of February 2016 has increased attention to the security dimensions of the technology.

Session outline:

This session will introduce the recent advances in biotechnology – starting with ‘traditional’ genetic modification as used in many crop varieties worldwide, and then focus on synthetic biology (e.g. the creation of synthetic bacterial genomes), genome editing, and gene drive technologies.
The major focus of the session will review the biosecurity issues, in particular the legal and ethical implications related to these technologies, how the scientific community is playing a critical role in self-governance, as well as lessons to be learned for public engagement based on past experiences with controversies over GMOs and stem cell research.

Speakers:

  • Speakers to be confirmed shortly.

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Universal Security, Multiple pathways: Critical cross-cultural perspectives on Human Security

Chaired by: Thomas Reuter, International Union of Anthropological Science (IUAES)

Abstract:

The concept of human security emerges from people-centred efforts to understand vulnerability and resilience. It is utterly different from narrow tribalist concepts of national security. As a new paradigm, the concept is driven in part by the urgent need to address global threats that transcend the jurisdiction and capability of nation states and where use of exclusionary armed security strategies is often an obstacle rather than a solution. As an issue of moral responsibility for the whole global community, human security also understands the condition of ‘security’ holistically. Whilst ensuring freedom from direct physical threat and violence is important, human security crucially also means ensuring all people’s equitable access to vital resources. Consequently, any denial of such access to any human being is an act of structural violence.
This panel seeks to explore human security from the cross-cultural perspective of anthropology. Going beyond simplistic metrics of supply and demand, we ask: What is it that threatens or guarantees humans’ access to vital resources such as food, water and livelihoods in different societies? What distinguishes different political economies, how do socio-cultural resources and values shape outcomes, and what are the variable constraints and opportunities for development interventions across different societies?

Speakers:

  • Thomas Reuter, Senior Vice-president of IUAES / University of Melbourne, Australia
    - Food Sovereignty and food Solidarity: Foundations of Human Security at Local and Global Levels
  • Andrew Mugsy Spiegel, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    - Misreading expectations of security: Development’s perverse uses of notions of appropriateness
  • Zhang Jijiao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China
    - Unequal Development Opportunities for the Developing Countries in the Current World
  • Sabine Mannitz, Head of Research Department ‘Glocal Junctions’, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, Germany
    - What’s behind security in security sector reform?
  • Thomas Hylland Eriksen, University of Oslo, Norway
    - Small scale in an overheated world: Security and insecurity in the Seychelles

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Overcoming Contemporary Global Crises based on the Relational Studies: a new approach to restore a society with equality and security

Chaired by: Keiko Sakai, Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University

Abstract:

Since the turn of the century, we have witnessed critical events and disasters such as 9.11, War on Afghanistan, War on Iraq, brutal aftermath of Arab Uprisings, Civil Wars in Syria and Yemen, as well as emergence of Islamic State. Wars and conflicts caused tremendous flow of refugees and migrants from Middle East to the Europe, which resulted in, in a way, the Brexit and birth of Trump administration. Socio-economic trans-border networks with SNS, modern technology, and global human mobilization, are now the part of our daily life, as subtheme 5 of the Conference < Globalization, diversity, and cultures of belonging > clearly points out.
As the above subtheme focuses “the rapid increase in mobility of human beings, money, commodities and information on society, economy and politics”, even a smallest event we experience can be a trigger to calamitous results that shook the whole world. 5 years-Syrian boy who was drowned in the Mediterranean Sea moved the global public opinion, caused serious discussions on multi-culturalism in the EU, giving a rise of populism, as well as of religious extremism.
How, then, can we grasp such complicated and intertwined web of relationships, from local level to global level? How can we analyse them, solve them and stop crises to occur again? This question is the starting point of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”. Can’t we establish an innovative area of academism to gather all the human wisdom and knowledge in order to solve these vital and crucial problems that our dear planet faces? This is the purpose of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”, which pursues freedom, democracy, and security from diverse aspects, as subtheme 9 deals with.
In this session, session organizer proposes a new perspective named “Relational Studies on Global Crises” to understand the current global crises which we believe will contribute to the WSSF’s challenge “to create a platform for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research to contribute to transformations to the sustainable world”. Session organizer invites three prominent scholars who study various conflicting areas based on various academic methodologies, but who share the necessity of introducing the new way forward to effective social and political change. These panelists are:

Wendy Bracewell, Professor of South-East European History, from UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES). Title of her presentation is “Eastern Europe without Borders”.
Filip Reyntjens, Emeritus Professor of Law and Politics, from Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), University of Antwerp. Title of his presentation is "A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict: The case of the African great lakes region".
Zahra Ali, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences. Title of her presentation is "Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq".
Adding to the above three, the session organizer, Keiko SAKAI, a professor and dean of the Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University gives her presentation on “Analysing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises”

Speakers:

  • Keiko Sakai, Faculty of Law, Dean of Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University, Japan
    - Analyzing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises
  • Wendy Bracewell, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), UK
    - Eastern Europe without Borders
  • Filip Reyntjens, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), Belgium
    - A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict:The case of the African great lakes region
  • Zahra Ali, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences, USA
    - Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Cross Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Education and Job Security among the Young

Chaired by: Emiko Usui, Japanese Economic Association (JEA)

Abstract:

Gender differences in college majors persists, which lead to gender differences in careers and job security. Many possible explanations have been offered for these gaps: such as gender differences in career preferences, individual abilities of separate academic fields, risk aversion, culture, gender stereotypes, and role models. This session—invited session of the Japanese Economic Association—aims to address these issues focusing on two countries: Japan and the United States.
We conducted a survey on undergraduate students at Kyushu University, Japan from December 1, 2016 to early January 2017, while being helped by the Kyushu University administration, to understand the gender differences in their perspectives for future career, job security, and family life. We will present two papers based on this survey. One paper demonstrates distinct gender differences in expectations of future career, job security, and family life. The results are striking that already wide gender gaps in preferences and career perspectives are present among the undergraduate students surveyed, though they entered college based on the same academic standard. The second paper evaluates how government policies can alter the students’ expectations of future career and job security and family concerns. The first paper will be presented by Emiko Usui, an experienced empirical labor economist with expertise in socio-economic surveys in Japan. The second paper will be presented by Tsunao Okumura, an innovative econometrician, who has contributed to the partial identification literature related to subjective expectation analysis. As the World Social Science Forum will be held in Kyushu, we will directly provide the latest results from Kyushu University to the Kyushu audience, which will provide significant implications not only for Kyushu, but also for the future of young people in Japan.
asit Zafar is a world leading researcher in this academic subject, who has also contributed to the survey at Kyushu University and has conducted subjective expectation surveys at many universities outside Japan. Basit will present his ongoing project that examines how the gender differences in risk preferences impact job search behaviors by collecting data on graduates of Bachelor of Business from an elite university in the US.
Donna Ginther will present her paper on gender differences in college majors in the US. Donna, an established scholar, is well-known for her research on gender differences in academic careers. In her paper, she will examine how gender stereotypes, culture, role models, competition, risk aversion, and interests contribute to gender STEM gap, starting at childhood, solidifying by middle school, and affecting women and men as they progress through school, higher education, and into the labor market.
In addition to her established academic career, she has contributed to various public activities. She was formerly on the board of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP) of the American Economic Association, and has overseen mentoring for junior economists at the CSWEP. These mentoring workshops have demonstrated that their programs had positive and significant impacts on the careers of the participants. She has testified before the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education of the US House of Representatives on Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. She has also advised the National Academies of Science, National Institutes of Health, and Sloan Foundation on the diversity and future of the scientific workforce. Her participation will be an excellent opportunity to learn how to provide mentoring workshops for junior researchers.

Speakers:

  • Emiko Usui, Institute for Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Education and Job Security of College Students in Japan
  • Tsunao Okumura, Graduate School of International Social Sciences, Yokohama National University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Career Choice of College Students in Japan
  • Basit Zafar, Department of Economics, Arizona State University, USA
    - Risk Preferences, Job Search, and the Gender Wage Gap
  • Donna Ginther, Center for Economic and Business Analysis at the Institute for Policy and Social Research, University of Kansas, USA
    - Women and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are Differences in Education and Careers Due to Stereotypes, Interests, or Family?

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Mobility, Diversity, and Human Networks: Asian Women’s Life Strategies

Chair: Noriko Ijichi, the Japan Sociological Society (JSS)

Abstract:

This research aims to collect fundamental data to clarify the potential of the micro-level lifeworld for generating cooperation in response to macro social change by describing and analyzing the processes of lifestyle creation, transformation, and recreation spawned by migration alongside changes in international society following the 20th century in East Asia. Taking migrant women as our subject, we hope to investigate not only generational background, migration histories, networks, and cultural transition and reorganization of the lifeworld in the host society, but specifically identify the logic produced in response to such changes by "non-mobile" members in sending societies responsible for maintaining and passing on culture. Kwon argues for the importance of reconsidering the place of women within migration research, delineating the viewpoint presented in this panel`s case studies, all of which focus on female migration within Asia. By investigating the migration of Korean women in Japan through family histories, Hong considers the meaning of an individual`s life situated within familial constraints. Sakurada`s paper compares cases of ethnic Chinese women in Malaysia who migrate for study and work opportunities with those who deliberately choose to remain at their birthplace, analyzing the social background that produces such decisions.
Kato and Ijichi examine the lifeworld of people who settled in Co To, an isolated island near the northeastern Vietnamese border. Focusing specifically on the motive for domestic migration, lifestyle following migration and relationships with the origin, this study discusses the manner in which the lifeworld develops when the path of migration is viewed from women`s perspective. Each of these studies examines the possibility of empirically and multifacetedly clarifying the dynamic change that occurs within an individual`s lifeworld alongside the major social transitions of 20th century Asia. Further, in contrast to prior literature concerning migrant populations in East Asia, we focus on specific practice in the lifeworld that cannot be entirely reduced to an individual`s response to politico-economic conditions, nor can it be converged with the nation-state; to our subjects, culture is not a return to tradition, nor is it a simple rejection of assimilation with the host society.

Speakers:

  • Heonik Kwon, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Rethinking Migration
  • Atsufumi Kato, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan & Noriko Ijichi, Osaka City University, Japan
    - Living on the edge: the lifeworld of settlers in a borderland island in Vietnam
  • Ryoko Sakurada, Ikuei Junior College, Japan
    - In Between the Choices and the Decisions: Dynamism of Rural-to-Urban Migration of Chinese Women in Malaysia
  • Hong, Jung-eun, Visiting Researcher Ritsumeikan Center for Korean Studies, Korea
    - Women's lives and dispersed Korean families in North Korea, South Korea, and Japan

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Engaging key stakeholders in addressing biosecurity challenges: Insights from the social sciences

In partnership with the Inter Academy partnership (IAP)

Background:

Many scientific advances – from Alfred Nobel’s dynamite, to the discovery of nuclear fission and now artificial intelligence and robotics – can be used for good or for harm.
Recent advances in biotechnology, including synthetic biology and genome editing, also fall into this category of dual-use research, raising the spectre of issues relating to biosecurity.
In the context of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), which was ratified in 1975, biosecurity is – “most commonly used to refer to mechanisms to establish and maintain the security and oversight of pathogenic microorganisms, toxins and relevant resources”.
However, major epidemics of infectious diseases such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the West African Ebola epidemic of 2013-2016 have highlighted the fact that biosecurity issues may emerge ‘naturally’ rather than by deliberate malfeasance.
In addition, rapid strides are being made in molecular biology and other relevant fields. Recent advances in synthetic biology and genome editing, such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system, for example, allow the manipulation of organisms with new levels of precision and at much cheaper costs – making it possible for a reasonably-well trained scientist or laboratory technician to carry out biotech procedures far from the public eye (there is even a growing DIY synthetic biology initiative).
Indeed, the fact that genome editing has been identified as a potential weapon of mass destruction by the U.S. Intelligence Community in its ‘Worldwide Threat Assessment’ of February 2016 has increased attention to the security dimensions of the technology.

Session outline:

This session will introduce the recent advances in biotechnology – starting with ‘traditional’ genetic modification as used in many crop varieties worldwide, and then focus on synthetic biology (e.g. the creation of synthetic bacterial genomes), genome editing, and gene drive technologies.
The major focus of the session will review the biosecurity issues, in particular the legal and ethical implications related to these technologies, how the scientific community is playing a critical role in self-governance, as well as lessons to be learned for public engagement based on past experiences with controversies over GMOs and stem cell research.

Speakers:

  • Speakers to be confirmed shortly.

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Universal Security, Multiple pathways: Critical cross-cultural perspectives on Human Security

Chaired by: Thomas Reuter, International Union of Anthropological Science (IUAES)

Abstract:

The concept of human security emerges from people-centred efforts to understand vulnerability and resilience. It is utterly different from narrow tribalist concepts of national security. As a new paradigm, the concept is driven in part by the urgent need to address global threats that transcend the jurisdiction and capability of nation states and where use of exclusionary armed security strategies is often an obstacle rather than a solution. As an issue of moral responsibility for the whole global community, human security also understands the condition of ‘security’ holistically. Whilst ensuring freedom from direct physical threat and violence is important, human security crucially also means ensuring all people’s equitable access to vital resources. Consequently, any denial of such access to any human being is an act of structural violence.
This panel seeks to explore human security from the cross-cultural perspective of anthropology. Going beyond simplistic metrics of supply and demand, we ask: What is it that threatens or guarantees humans’ access to vital resources such as food, water and livelihoods in different societies? What distinguishes different political economies, how do socio-cultural resources and values shape outcomes, and what are the variable constraints and opportunities for development interventions across different societies?

Speakers:

  • Thomas Reuter, Senior Vice-president of IUAES / University of Melbourne, Australia
    - Food Sovereignty and food Solidarity: Foundations of Human Security at Local and Global Levels
  • Andrew Mugsy Spiegel, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    - Misreading expectations of security: Development’s perverse uses of notions of appropriateness
  • Zhang Jijiao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China
    - Unequal Development Opportunities for the Developing Countries in the Current World
  • Sabine Mannitz, Head of Research Department ‘Glocal Junctions’, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, Germany
    - What’s behind security in security sector reform?
  • Thomas Hylland Eriksen, University of Oslo, Norway
    - Small scale in an overheated world: Security and insecurity in the Seychelles

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Overcoming Contemporary Global Crises based on the Relational Studies: a new approach to restore a society with equality and security

Chaired by: Keiko Sakai, Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University

Abstract:

Since the turn of the century, we have witnessed critical events and disasters such as 9.11, War on Afghanistan, War on Iraq, brutal aftermath of Arab Uprisings, Civil Wars in Syria and Yemen, as well as emergence of Islamic State. Wars and conflicts caused tremendous flow of refugees and migrants from Middle East to the Europe, which resulted in, in a way, the Brexit and birth of Trump administration. Socio-economic trans-border networks with SNS, modern technology, and global human mobilization, are now the part of our daily life, as subtheme 5 of the Conference < Globalization, diversity, and cultures of belonging > clearly points out.
As the above subtheme focuses “the rapid increase in mobility of human beings, money, commodities and information on society, economy and politics”, even a smallest event we experience can be a trigger to calamitous results that shook the whole world. 5 years-Syrian boy who was drowned in the Mediterranean Sea moved the global public opinion, caused serious discussions on multi-culturalism in the EU, giving a rise of populism, as well as of religious extremism.
How, then, can we grasp such complicated and intertwined web of relationships, from local level to global level? How can we analyse them, solve them and stop crises to occur again? This question is the starting point of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”. Can’t we establish an innovative area of academism to gather all the human wisdom and knowledge in order to solve these vital and crucial problems that our dear planet faces? This is the purpose of “Relational Studies on Global Crises”, which pursues freedom, democracy, and security from diverse aspects, as subtheme 9 deals with.
In this session, session organizer proposes a new perspective named “Relational Studies on Global Crises” to understand the current global crises which we believe will contribute to the WSSF’s challenge “to create a platform for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research to contribute to transformations to the sustainable world”. Session organizer invites three prominent scholars who study various conflicting areas based on various academic methodologies, but who share the necessity of introducing the new way forward to effective social and political change. These panelists are:

Wendy Bracewell, Professor of South-East European History, from UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES). Title of her presentation is “Eastern Europe without Borders”.
Filip Reyntjens, Emeritus Professor of Law and Politics, from Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), University of Antwerp. Title of his presentation is "A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict: The case of the African great lakes region".
Zahra Ali, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences. Title of her presentation is "Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq".
Adding to the above three, the session organizer, Keiko SAKAI, a professor and dean of the Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University gives her presentation on “Analysing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises”

Speakers:

  • Keiko Sakai, Faculty of Law, Dean of Center for Relational Studies on Global Crises, Chiba University, Japan
    - Analyzing the conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of Relational Studies on Global Crises
  • Wendy Bracewell, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), UK
    - Eastern Europe without Borders
  • Filip Reyntjens, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), Belgium
    - A multi-causal approach to protracted conflict:The case of the African great lakes region
  • Zahra Ali, Rutgers- Newark College of Arts and Sciences, USA
    - Gender, Sectarianism and Citizenship in post-2003 Iraq

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Cross Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Education and Job Security among the Young

Chaired by: Emiko Usui, Japanese Economic Association (JEA)

Abstract:

Gender differences in college majors persists, which lead to gender differences in careers and job security. Many possible explanations have been offered for these gaps: such as gender differences in career preferences, individual abilities of separate academic fields, risk aversion, culture, gender stereotypes, and role models. This session—invited session of the Japanese Economic Association—aims to address these issues focusing on two countries: Japan and the United States.
We conducted a survey on undergraduate students at Kyushu University, Japan from December 1, 2016 to early January 2017, while being helped by the Kyushu University administration, to understand the gender differences in their perspectives for future career, job security, and family life. We will present two papers based on this survey. One paper demonstrates distinct gender differences in expectations of future career, job security, and family life. The results are striking that already wide gender gaps in preferences and career perspectives are present among the undergraduate students surveyed, though they entered college based on the same academic standard. The second paper evaluates how government policies can alter the students’ expectations of future career and job security and family concerns. The first paper will be presented by Emiko Usui, an experienced empirical labor economist with expertise in socio-economic surveys in Japan. The second paper will be presented by Tsunao Okumura, an innovative econometrician, who has contributed to the partial identification literature related to subjective expectation analysis. As the World Social Science Forum will be held in Kyushu, we will directly provide the latest results from Kyushu University to the Kyushu audience, which will provide significant implications not only for Kyushu, but also for the future of young people in Japan.
asit Zafar is a world leading researcher in this academic subject, who has also contributed to the survey at Kyushu University and has conducted subjective expectation surveys at many universities outside Japan. Basit will present his ongoing project that examines how the gender differences in risk preferences impact job search behaviors by collecting data on graduates of Bachelor of Business from an elite university in the US.
Donna Ginther will present her paper on gender differences in college majors in the US. Donna, an established scholar, is well-known for her research on gender differences in academic careers. In her paper, she will examine how gender stereotypes, culture, role models, competition, risk aversion, and interests contribute to gender STEM gap, starting at childhood, solidifying by middle school, and affecting women and men as they progress through school, higher education, and into the labor market.
In addition to her established academic career, she has contributed to various public activities. She was formerly on the board of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP) of the American Economic Association, and has overseen mentoring for junior economists at the CSWEP. These mentoring workshops have demonstrated that their programs had positive and significant impacts on the careers of the participants. She has testified before the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education of the US House of Representatives on Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. She has also advised the National Academies of Science, National Institutes of Health, and Sloan Foundation on the diversity and future of the scientific workforce. Her participation will be an excellent opportunity to learn how to provide mentoring workshops for junior researchers.

Speakers:

  • Emiko Usui, Institute for Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Education and Job Security of College Students in Japan
  • Tsunao Okumura, Graduate School of International Social Sciences, Yokohama National University, Japan
    - Gender Differences in Career Choice of College Students in Japan
  • Basit Zafar, Department of Economics, Arizona State University, USA
    - Risk Preferences, Job Search, and the Gender Wage Gap
  • Donna Ginther, Center for Economic and Business Analysis at the Institute for Policy and Social Research, University of Kansas, USA
    - Women and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Are Differences in Education and Careers Due to Stereotypes, Interests, or Family?

DAY 3

Thursday / 27-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 3

Mobility, Diversity, and Human Networks: Asian Women’s Life Strategies

Chair: Noriko Ijichi, the Japan Sociological Society (JSS)

Abstract:

This research aims to collect fundamental data to clarify the potential of the micro-level lifeworld for generating cooperation in response to macro social change by describing and analyzing the processes of lifestyle creation, transformation, and recreation spawned by migration alongside changes in international society following the 20th century in East Asia. Taking migrant women as our subject, we hope to investigate not only generational background, migration histories, networks, and cultural transition and reorganization of the lifeworld in the host society, but specifically identify the logic produced in response to such changes by "non-mobile" members in sending societies responsible for maintaining and passing on culture. Kwon argues for the importance of reconsidering the place of women within migration research, delineating the viewpoint presented in this panel`s case studies, all of which focus on female migration within Asia. By investigating the migration of Korean women in Japan through family histories, Hong considers the meaning of an individual`s life situated within familial constraints. Sakurada`s paper compares cases of ethnic Chinese women in Malaysia who migrate for study and work opportunities with those who deliberately choose to remain at their birthplace, analyzing the social background that produces such decisions.
Kato and Ijichi examine the lifeworld of people who settled in Co To, an isolated island near the northeastern Vietnamese border. Focusing specifically on the motive for domestic migration, lifestyle following migration and relationships with the origin, this study discusses the manner in which the lifeworld develops when the path of migration is viewed from women`s perspective. Each of these studies examines the possibility of empirically and multifacetedly clarifying the dynamic change that occurs within an individual`s lifeworld alongside the major social transitions of 20th century Asia. Further, in contrast to prior literature concerning migrant populations in East Asia, we focus on specific practice in the lifeworld that cannot be entirely reduced to an individual`s response to politico-economic conditions, nor can it be converged with the nation-state; to our subjects, culture is not a return to tradition, nor is it a simple rejection of assimilation with the host society.

Speakers:

  • Heonik Kwon, University of Cambridge, UK
    - Rethinking Migration
  • Atsufumi Kato, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan & Noriko Ijichi, Osaka City University, Japan
    - Living on the edge: the lifeworld of settlers in a borderland island in Vietnam
  • Ryoko Sakurada, Ikuei Junior College, Japan
    - In Between the Choices and the Decisions: Dynamism of Rural-to-Urban Migration of Chinese Women in Malaysia
  • Hong, Jung-eun, Visiting Researcher Ritsumeikan Center for Korean Studies, Korea
    - Women's lives and dispersed Korean families in North Korea, South Korea, and Japan

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28-SEP / DAY 4 / PROGRAM

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
9:00-10:30

Plenary DAY4

New Forms of Conflict in a Global Age

ISSC, South Africa’s Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC),
The Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA)

Abstract:

The session will explore war in the modern world, including discussions on new types of conflicts, hybrid warfare, new weapons and arms trade. It will be the occasion of a unique discussion on new forms of conflict in a global age between a diverse group of leading lights. Hoda Abdel-Hamid, a prize-winning war correspondent with Al Jazeera, will act as moderator for this exciting panel which includes: General Roméo Dallaire, author of the best-seller book Shake Hands With the Devil and founder of the international Child Soldiers Initiative; the world-renowned expert on transnational terrorism and former Minister of Foreign Affairs from Mauritania Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou; the thought-leader on the global arms trade and corruption Andrew Feinstein; and the specialist on bio-weapons and misuse of scientific research Jo Husbands.

Speakers:

  • General Roméo Dallaire, renowned Canadian humanitarian, author and retired Senator and General
  • Andrew Feinstein, Executive Director of Corruption Watch, Investigative Writer, Broadcaster and Campaigner
  • Jo Husbands, Senior Project Director, U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
  • Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, Professor of International History, Graduate Institute, Geneva

Moderator: Hoda Abdel-Hamid, an award-winning correspondent for Al Jazeera English

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

From co-designing to co-delivery of risk reduction solutions

In partnership with IAP

Abstract:

A recent report on disaster science (Global Outlook of Disaster Science, 2017) by Elsevier has pointed out some crucial gaps and challenges in the disaster risk reduction research as follow: 1) the countries having highest casualty has lowest percentage of disaster research, and the countries with highest economic impacts have the maximum numbers of disaster research, 2) the countries with higher number of disaster research does not necessarily have the highest research impacts. This shows the importance of policy as well as community research. While the needs and importance of trans-, multi- and inter-disciplinary research have been discussed and highlighted in several forums, there still remains a core gap on identifying the research issues and providing need based solutions.
The proposed session will focus on the whole spectrum from co-designing research topics to co-delivery solutions along with different stakeholders, especially private sectors, civil society and local governments. Equal emphasis will be provided on the research process, research results and its implementation. The session will provide specific examples of demand driven research process and results from different parts of the world.

Speakers:

  • Speakers to be confirmed shortly.

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Current Situation of Social Inclusion for Immigrants

Chaired by: Yoshitaka Ishikawa, National Committee of Japan for International Geographical Union (IGU)

Abstract:

Globalization is recognized as the increasing interaction in terms of the migration and the movement of people, trade and transactions, capital and investment movements, and the dissemination of knowledge. Globalization has strengthened the interdependence of economic and cultural activities among countries/regions in our contemporary world. We are deeply interested in human migration among them and focus on immigrants as the consequence of such international human flows.
International migration is also attracting much attention because parts of these countries/regions are experiencing low fertility, aging, and population decline. The new challenges of these demographic trends require comprehensive reassessments of many existing policies and programs, including those related to international migration. In this context, the United Nations report published in 2001 addressed replacement migration for eight low-fertility countries (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States) and two regions (Europe and the European Union). Replacement migration is the international migration needed by a country/region to offset population decline and population aging caused by low fertility and mortality rates.
Although we understand the idea of replacement migration, its chief concern lies in the amount of new immigration to a particular country/region. However, such an idea should be supplemented by scrutiny that focuses on whether the lives of immigrants in the destination countries are improving. In this regard, the perspective of social inclusion, which seeks to confer certain rights to all immigrants and ethnic groups in various aspects of the host society, is significant. Specific situations associated with immigrant inclusion can be investigated through employment, occupation, residence, migration, education, marriage, family formation, and so on. The importance of such perspectives is not limited to countries/regions that were studied in the United Nations report on replacement migration; it also needs to be the case for other countries/regions including such “nations of immigrants” as Australia and Canada.
We are also concentrating on diversity associated with social inclusion. Which factors can explain the differences in the current stages of social inclusion among countries/regions: historical background, immigration policy, ethnicity of immigrants, or mode of incorporation?
Keeping the above discussion in mind and focusing on geographical or sociological studies whose chief subjects are Asian immigrants, we are organizing our session called the “Current situation of social inclusion for immigrants.” This session consists of four papers by speakers from Japan, Taiwan, and Australia.
In the context of the World Social Science Forum in Fukuoka, this invited session is organized by the National Committee of Japan for the International Geographical Union (IGU), which is Japan’s IGU affiliate. IGU, which is a major member organization of the International Social Science Council (ISSC), has approximately 40 commissions, and this session’s speakers are affiliated with the commission on Global Change and Human Mobility (Globility) that was established in 2000.

Speakers:

  • John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - Migration, social inclusion and places of difference: Australian cities in the age of Trump and Hanson
  • Ji-Ping Lin and Chyong-fang Ko (Academia Sinica /Taiwan)
    - Multiculturalism and social inclusion: changing migration policies and possible changes in Taiwan
  • Sachi Takahata (University of Shizuoka/ Japan)
    - Wives, children and Nikkei's: Filipinos coming to Japan based on the attributions
  • Shuko Takeshita (Aichi Gakuin University / Japan)
    - Social inclusion and exclusion in Japan: from the perspective of intermarriage

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Border Studies Today: Theoretical development and its role in the contemporary world

Chaired by: Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University

Abstract:

This panel sits at the heart of the conference, although its topic sits somewhat at variance with the individual themes. While one of Kyushu University’s strengths is its focus on Asia, here I would like to expand the discussion to the globe as a whole. As it has been common for the humanities and social sciences to adopt an area studies approach, which threatens to focus only on Asia, this panel will seek to incorporate European, American and Russian scholars with us. Unique about border studies is its multi-disciplinarity and ability to go beyond mere regionalism.
Ideally, the panel takes the form of a roundtable.

Speakers:

  • Martin van der Velde, Radboud University, Netherlands / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2014-2015, John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - European Borders Studies in the past decades
  • Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, George Mason University, USA / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2017-
    - Border in the Americas in the Era of Trump, Walls and Closed Borders
  • Serghei Golunov, CAFS, Kyushu University
    - Theory-Practice Gap in Contemporary Border Studies
  • Akihiro Iwashita, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2015-2016
    - Back to the Future: A world of “fortresses”?

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Addressing the Multidimensionality of Security to Achieve Agenda 2030:

In partnership with UNESCO’s Management of Social Transformations programme (MOST)

*More information to come shortly.

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

From co-designing to co-delivery of risk reduction solutions

Abstract:

A recent report on disaster science (Global Outlook of Disaster Science, 2017) by Elsevier has pointed out some crucial gaps and challenges in the disaster risk reduction research as follow: 1) the countries having highest casualty has lowest percentage of disaster research, and the countries with highest economic impacts have the maximum numbers of disaster research, 2) the countries with higher number of disaster research does not necessarily have the highest research impacts. This shows the importance of policy as well as community research. While the needs and importance of trans-, multi- and inter-disciplinary research have been discussed and highlighted in several forums, there still remains a core gap on identifying the research issues and providing need based solutions.
The proposed session will focus on the whole spectrum from co-designing research topics to co-delivery solutions along with different stakeholders, especially private sectors, civil society and local governments. Equal emphasis will be provided on the research process, research results and its implementation. The session will provide specific examples of demand driven research process and results from different parts of the world.

Speakers:

  • Speakers to be confirmed shortly.

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Current Situation of Social Inclusion for Immigrants

Chaired by: Yoshitaka Ishikawa, National Committee of Japan for International Geographical Union (IGU)

Abstract:

Globalization is recognized as the increasing interaction in terms of the migration and the movement of people, trade and transactions, capital and investment movements, and the dissemination of knowledge. Globalization has strengthened the interdependence of economic and cultural activities among countries/regions in our contemporary world. We are deeply interested in human migration among them and focus on immigrants as the consequence of such international human flows.
International migration is also attracting much attention because parts of these countries/regions are experiencing low fertility, aging, and population decline. The new challenges of these demographic trends require comprehensive reassessments of many existing policies and programs, including those related to international migration. In this context, the United Nations report published in 2001 addressed replacement migration for eight low-fertility countries (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and United States) and two regions (Europe and the European Union). Replacement migration is the international migration needed by a country/region to offset population decline and population aging caused by low fertility and mortality rates.
Although we understand the idea of replacement migration, its chief concern lies in the amount of new immigration to a particular country/region. However, such an idea should be supplemented by scrutiny that focuses on whether the lives of immigrants in the destination countries are improving. In this regard, the perspective of social inclusion, which seeks to confer certain rights to all immigrants and ethnic groups in various aspects of the host society, is significant. Specific situations associated with immigrant inclusion can be investigated through employment, occupation, residence, migration, education, marriage, family formation, and so on. The importance of such perspectives is not limited to countries/regions that were studied in the United Nations report on replacement migration; it also needs to be the case for other countries/regions including such “nations of immigrants” as Australia and Canada.
We are also concentrating on diversity associated with social inclusion. Which factors can explain the differences in the current stages of social inclusion among countries/regions: historical background, immigration policy, ethnicity of immigrants, or mode of incorporation?
Keeping the above discussion in mind and focusing on geographical or sociological studies whose chief subjects are Asian immigrants, we are organizing our session called the “Current situation of social inclusion for immigrants.” This session consists of four papers by speakers from Japan, Taiwan, and Australia.
In the context of the World Social Science Forum in Fukuoka, this invited session is organized by the National Committee of Japan for the International Geographical Union (IGU), which is Japan’s IGU affiliate. IGU, which is a major member organization of the International Social Science Council (ISSC), has approximately 40 commissions, and this session’s speakers are affiliated with the commission on Global Change and Human Mobility (Globility) that was established in 2000.

Speakers:

  • John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - Migration, social inclusion and places of difference: Australian cities in the age of Trump and Hanson
  • Ji-Ping Lin and Chyong-fang Ko (Academia Sinica /Taiwan)
    - Multiculturalism and social inclusion: changing migration policies and possible changes in Taiwan
  • Sachi Takahata (University of Shizuoka/ Japan)
    - Wives, children and Nikkei's: Filipinos coming to Japan based on the attributions
  • Shuko Takeshita (Aichi Gakuin University / Japan)
    - Social inclusion and exclusion in Japan: from the perspective of intermarriage

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Border Studies Today: Theoretical development and its role in the contemporary world

Chaired by: Akihiro Iwashita, Kyushu University

Abstract:

This panel sits at the heart of the conference, although its topic sits somewhat at variance with the individual themes. While one of Kyushu University’s strengths is its focus on Asia, here I would like to expand the discussion to the globe as a whole. As it has been common for the humanities and social sciences to adopt an area studies approach, which threatens to focus only on Asia, this panel will seek to incorporate European, American and Russian scholars with us. Unique about border studies is its multi-disciplinarity and ability to go beyond mere regionalism.
Ideally, the panel takes the form of a roundtable.

Speakers:

  • Martin van der Velde, Radboud University, Netherlands / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2014-2015, John Connell, University of Sydney, Australia
    - European Borders Studies in the past decades
  • Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, George Mason University, USA / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2017-
    - Border in the Americas in the Era of Trump, Walls and Closed Borders
  • Serghei Golunov, CAFS, Kyushu University
    - Theory-Practice Gap in Contemporary Border Studies
  • Akihiro Iwashita, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University, Japan / President of Association for Borderlands Studies: 2015-2016
    - Back to the Future: A world of “fortresses”?

DAY 4

Friday / 28-Sept
11:00-12:30

Invited Day 4

Addressing the Multidimensionality of Security to Achieve Agenda 2030:

In partnership with UNESCO’s Management of Social Transformations programme (MOST)

*More information to come shortly.

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